Search Results

Keywords: Development

Historical Items

View All Showing 2 of 411 Showing 3 of 411

Item 4175

Plan of the City of Portland, 1837

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1837 Location: Portland Media: Paper

Item 4174

Map of Portland and vicinity, 1900

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1900 Location: Portland Media: Paper

Item 102260

Don't take the port out of Portland, 1986

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1986 Location: Portland Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Tax Records

View All Showing 2 of 19145 Showing 3 of 19145

Item 57474

28 Hanover Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Maurice Cowan Use: Dwelling - Single family

Item 69138

73-81 Park Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Stuart O. Symonds Use: Dwelling - Two family

Item 31992

8 A Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Marial B. Soule Style: victorian - double house Use: Dwelling - Single family

Exhibits

View All Showing 2 of 90 Showing 3 of 90

Exhibit

Sylvan Site: A Model Development

Frederick Wheeler Hinckley, a Portland lawyer and politician, had grand visions of a 200-home development when he began the Sylvan Site in South Portland in 1917. The stock market crash in 1929 put a halt to his plans, but by then he had built 37, no two of which were alike.

Exhibit

Maine Through the Eyes of George W. French

George French, a native of Kezar Falls and graduate of Bates College, worked at several jobs before turning to photography as his career. He served for many years as photographer for the Maine Development Commission, taking pictures intended to promote both development and tourism.

Exhibit

Horace W. Shaylor: Portland Penman

Horace W. Shaylor, a native of Ohio, settled in Portland and turned his focus to handwriting, developing several unique books of handwriting instruction. He also was a talented artist.

Site Pages

View All Showing 2 of 199 Showing 3 of 199

Site Page

City of Portland Planning & Urban Development

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - The Development of an Island-wide Identity

The Development of an Island-wide Identity The Roscoe B. Jackson Memorial Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ca.

Site Page

Blue Hill, Maine - Blue Hill Spearheads Development on the Downeast Coast

Blue Hill Spearheads Development on the Downeast Coast One of the last places on the Maine coast to be settled by the English was the Penobscot Bay…

My Maine Stories

View All Showing 2 of 12 Showing 3 of 12

Story

My career as a chemical engineer for S.D. Warren Paper Company
by Charles Dodge

I worked in S.D. Warren's laboratory, and developed paper coatings, like Ultracast technology

Story

My 40 years in Forestry and the Paper Industry in Maine
by Donna Cassese

I was the first female forester hired by Scott Paper and continue to find new uses for wood.

Story

Passamaquoddy Maple, reaching back to our ancestral roots
by Marie Harnois

Tribally owned Passamaquoddy Maple is an economic and cultural heritage opportunity

Lesson Plans

View All Showing 2 of 48 Showing 3 of 48

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: An American Studies Approach to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was truly a man of his time and of his nation; this native of Portland, Maine and graduate of Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine became an American icon. Lines from his poems intersperse our daily speech and the characters of his long narrative poems have become part of American myth. Longfellow's fame was international; scholars, politicians, heads-of-state and everyday people read and memorized his poems. Our goal is to show that just as Longfellow reacted to and participated in his times, so his poetry participated in shaping and defining American culture and literature. The following unit plan introduces and demonstrates an American Studies approach to the life and work of Longfellow. Because the collaborative work that forms the basis for this unit was partially responsible for leading the two of us to complete the American & New England Studies Masters program at University of Southern Maine, we returned there for a working definition of "American Studies approach" as it applies to the grade level classroom. Joe Conforti, who was director at the time we both went through the program, offered some useful clarifying comments and explanation. He reminded us that such a focus provides a holistic approach to the life and work of an author. It sets a work of literature in a broad cultural and historical context as well as in the context of the poet's life. The aim of an American Studies approach is to "broaden the context of a work to illuminate the American past" (Conforti) for your students. We have found this approach to have multiple benefits at the classroom and research level. It brings the poems and the poet alive for students and connects with other curricular work, especially social studies. When linked with a Maine history unit, it helps to place Portland and Maine in an historical and cultural context. It also provides an inviting atmosphere for the in-depth study of the mechanics of Longfellow's poetry. What follows is a set of lesson plans that form a unit of study. The biographical "anchor" that we have used for this unit is an out-of-print biography An American Bard: The story of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, by Ruth Langland Holberg, Thomas Y. Crowell & Company, c1963. Permission has been requested to make this work available as a downloadable file off this web page, but in the meantime, used copies are readily and cheaply available from various vendors. The poem we have chosen to demonstrate our approach is "Paul Revere's Ride." The worksheets were developed by Judy Donahue, the explanatory essays researched and written by the two of us, and our sources are cited below. We have also included a list of helpful links. When possible we have included helpful material in text format, or have supplied site links. Our complete unit includes other Longfellow poems with the same approach, but in the interest of time and space, they are not included. Please feel free to contact us with questions and comments.

Lesson Plan

Portland History: Construction, Preservation and Restoration of the Portland Observatory

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
Included here are activities based in economics, mathematics, physics, social studies, civics and language arts. Students can debate the issues surrounding preservation and urban development as well as the changing value of money.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Longfellow Meets German Radical Poet Ferdinand Freiligrath

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
During Longfellow's 1842 travels in Germany he made the acquaintance of the politically radical Ferdinand Freiligrath, one of the influential voices calling for social revolution in his country. It is suggested that this association with Freiligrath along with his return visit with Charles Dickens influenced Longfellow's slavery poems. This essay traces Longfellow's interest in the German poet, Freiligrath's development as a radical poetic voice, and Longfellow's subsequent visit with Charles Dickens. Samples of verse and prose are provided to illustrate each writer's social conscience.