Search Results

Keywords: Day family

Historical Items

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Item 98891

Ezekiel Day letter to daughter Lucretia, Portland, 1837

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1837 Location: Portland; New York Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 99340

Lucretia Day to Kiah Sewall, Portland, 1830

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1830 Location: Portland; New York Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 98887

Lucretia Day letter to Kiah Sewall, Portland, 1835

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1835 Location: Portland; Boston Media: Pencil on paper

  view a full transcription

Tax Records

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Item 32302

10 A Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Rachel O Day Style: Vernacular Victorian Use: Dwelling - Single family

Item 49995

56 Elm Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Elizabeth A Day Use: Dwelling - Two family

Item 50012

76-80 Elm Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Elizabeth A Day Use: Dwelling - Two family

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

A Day for Remembering

Most societies have had rituals or times set aside to honor ancestors, those who have died and have paved the way for the living. Memorial Day, the last Monday in May, is the day Americans have set aside for such remembrances.

Exhibit

Elise Fellows White: Music, Writing, and Family

From a violin prodigy in her early years to an older woman -- mother of two -- struggling financially, Skowhegan native Mary Elise Fellows White remained committed to music, writing, poetry, her extended family -- and living a life that would matter and be remembered.

Exhibit

Valentines

Valentines Day cards have long been a way to express feelings of romance or love for family or friends. These early Valentines Day cards suggest the ways in which the expression of those sentiments has changed over time.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Lincoln, Maine - The Stanislaus Family

… on the Stanislaus Family Why did the Stanislaus family live in Lincoln? I think that the Stanislaus family chose to live in Lincoln in the 1920s…

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Day 8

Day eight was a happy day for most families because of just the relief of the storm being over. Written by Naomi Harrison Ice storm, Academy…

Site Page

Scarborough: They Called It Owascoag - Catch of the Day: Clamming and Lobstering - Page 2 of 4

Catch of the Day: Clamming and Lobstering Protection of clams in the Town of Scarborough, 1853Item Contributed byScarborough Historical…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Peace in Maine
by Rebekah Tower

My story is about my family vacations to Maine when I was growing up.

Story

My father's world - the old farm in Richmond, Maine
by Donald C. Cunningham

A story about my father and our family.

Story

Apple Time - a visit to the ancestral farm
by Randy Randall

Memories from childhood of visiting the family homestead in Limington during apple picking time.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: The Exile of the People of Longfellow's "Evangeline"

Grade Level: 6-8 Content Area: Social Studies
Other materials needed: - Copy of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's "Evangeline" - Print media and Internet access for research - Deportation Orders (may use primary document with a secondary source interpretation) Throughout the course of history there have been many events in which great suffering was inflicted upon innocent people. The story of the Acadian expulsion is one such event. Britain and France, the two most powerful nations of Europe, were at war off and on throughout the 18th century. North America became a coveted prize for both warring nations. The French Acadians of present day Nova Scotia fell victim to great suffering. Even under an oath of allegiance to England, the Acadians were advised that their families were to be deported and their lands confiscated by the English. This event was immortalized by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's epic poem "Evangeline", which was published in 1847.