Search Results

Keywords: Couples

Historical Items

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Mystery Corner Item

Item 101517

Mr. and Mrs. C.W. Jordan, Biddeford, 1916

Mystery Corner Item Who were the Jordans, where were they from?

Contributed by: McArthur Public Library Date: 1916-09-11 Location: Biddeford Media: Glass Negative

Item 1154

Ball announcement, Alfred, 1863

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1863-03-24 Location: Alfred Media: Ink on paper

Item 35011

John and Sarah Williams Young, Hallowell, ca. 1864

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1864 Location: Hallowell Media: Ambrotype

Exhibits

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Exhibit

A Parade, an Airplane and Two Weddings

Two couples, a parade from downtown Caribou to the airfield, and two airplane flights were the scene in 1930 when the couples each took off in a single-engine plane to tie the knot high over Aroostook County.

Exhibit

In Canada During the Civil War

One surviving letter from the family of Francis Pratt to the young man who was in Canada in 1865 suggests that going to Canada to escape military service during the Civil War was not unheard of. The letter also suggests money was removed to Canada to protect it.

Exhibit

Student Exhibit: Somerset Railroad

The Somerset Railroad was completed in 1872. It started out as a dream to link the Maine Coast with Canadian businesses to the north. It ran from the North Woods around Moosehead Lake down to Southern Maine and back again for 56 years.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Online Items

… to provide rural education, but children within a couple miles of the village attended the Village School.

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - Online Items

… points will be moved to allow the string to be coupled to the engine in the center. That engine will then haul the string down to Farmington.

Site Page

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village - 1895 Village School

… to provide rural education, but children within a couple miles of the village attended the Village School.

My Maine Stories

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Story

I have thought about Vietnam almost every day for 48 years
by Ted Heselton

Working as a heavy equipment operator in Vietnam

Story

In 1970 I served in Vietnam, and sent my parents a package
by Peter P. Joyce Jr.

My Parents' war story

Story

My Mom was a nurse in the 8055 MASH, Korea
by Pat MacPherson

I’m so proud of my mother and the thousands of Army & Navy nurses who served in WWII & Korea

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: The Acadian Diaspora - Reading "Evangeline" as a Feminist and Metaphoric Text

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Evangeline, Longfellow's heroine, has long been read as a search for Evangeline's long-lost love, Gabrielle--separated by the British in 1755 at the time of the Grand Derangement, the Acadian Diaspora. The couple comes to find each other late in life and the story ends. Or does it? Why does Longfellow choose to tell the story of this cultural group with a woman as the protagonist who is a member of a minority culture the Acadians? Does this say something about Longfellow's ability for understanding the misfortunes of others? Who is Evangeline searching for? Is it Gabriel, or her long-lost land of Acadia? Does the couple represent that which is lost to them, the land of their birth and rebirth? These are some of the thoughts and ideas which permeate Longfellow's text, Evangeline, beyond the tale of two lovers lost to one another. As the documentary, Evangeline's Quest (see below) states: "The Acadians, the only people to celebrate their defeat." They, as a cultural group, are found in the poem and their story is told.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport"

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Longfellow's poem "The Jewish Cemetery at Newport" opens up the issue of the earliest history of the Jews in America, and the significant roles they played as businessmen and later benefactors to the greater community. The history of the building itself is notable in terms of early American architecture, its having been designed, apparently gratis, by the most noted architect of the day. Furthermore, the poem traces the history of Newport as kind of a microcosm of New England commercial cities before the industrialization boom. For almost any age student the poem could be used to open up interest in local cemeteries, which are almost always a wealth of curiousities and history. Longfellow and his friends enjoyed exploring cemeteries, and today our little local cemeteries can be used to teach little local histories and parts of the big picture as well. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow visited the Jewish cemetery in Newport, RI on July 9, 1852. His popular poem about the site, published two years later, was certainly a sympathetic portrayal of the place and its people. In addition to Victorian romantic musings about the "Hebrews in their graves," Longfellow includes in this poem references to the historic persecution of the Jews, as well as very specific references to their religious practices. Since the cemetery and the nearby synagogue were restored and protected with an infusion of funding just a couple years after Longfellow's visit, and later a congregation again assembled, his gloomy predictions about the place proved false (never mind the conclusion of the poem, "And the dead nations never rise again!"). Nevertheless, it is a fascinating poem, and an interesting window into the history of the nation's oldest extant synagogue.