Search Results

Keywords: Books

Historical Items

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Item 29301

Book of Psalms and New Testament, Kennebunk, ca. 1854

Contributed by: Brick Store Museum Date: circa 1854 Location: Kennebunk Media: book, Ink on paper

Item 102226

Directions for the funeral of Jabez Fox, Falmouth Neck, ca. 1755

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: circa 1755 Location: Portland; Falmouth Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 23778

Hannah Pierce letter about teaching, books, 1814

Contributed by: Pierce Family Collection through Maine Historical Society Date: 1814 Location: Fryeburg; Bridgton Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Tax Records

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Item 75761

Assessor's Record, 181-183 State Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: John J. Cunningham Use: Store - Book Mart

Item 86084

5 Warwick Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Emil E. Mayer Use: Dwelling - Single family

Item 31992

8 A Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Marial B. Soule Style: victorian - double house Use: Dwelling - Single family

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Student Exhibit: Rebecca Sophie Clarke

Sophie May, whose real name was Rebecca Clarke, was the author of over 40 books between 1861 and 1903. She wrote the "Little Prudy Series" based on the little town of Norridgewock.

Exhibit

John Y. Merrill: Leeds Farmer, Entrepreneur, & More

John Y. Merrill of Leeds (1823-1898) made terse entries in diaries he kept for 11 years. His few words still provide a glimpse into the life of a mid 18th century farmer, who also made shoes, quarried stone, moved barns, made healing salves -- and was active in civic affairs.

Exhibit

Bookplates Honor Annie Louise Cary

A summer resident of Wayne collected more than 3,000 bookplates to honor Maine native and noted opera singer Annie Louise Cary and to support the Cary Memorial Library.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - Dirigo Writing Book, Farmington, 1887

… Description The school composition book called the "Dirigo Writing Book for Common Schools" was published in Portland by Loring, Short…

Site Page

John Martin: Expert Observer - Scrap & Sketch Book 2: 1864-1866

… Historical Society and Maine State Museum In the book he labeled "Scrap & Sketch Book," John Martin veered from the format he used in his Journal…

Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - White's Graded School Series, Complete Arithmetic book, 1870

White's Graded School Series, Complete Arithmetic book, 1870 Contributed by Farmington Historical Society Description Complete Arithmetic…

My Maine Stories

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Story

My Africa Book and living in Portland
by Titi de Baccarat

My art is about being an immigrant in the US, my pain, fear, uncertainty, and hope for my future

Story

The Pilots Grill, Bangor
by Rodney Duplisea

Memories of the Pilots Grill in Bangor

Story

Classroom Time Capsule
by Anna Bennett

On March 12, 2020, I left my classroom not knowing I wouldn't return again for months.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Stewarding Maine's Natural Resources

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce elementary-grade students to the concepts and importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK), taught and understood through oral history to generations of Wabanaki peoples. Through learning about important figures in the region’s history – including Molly Ockett (Pigwacket, ca. 1740-1816) and David Moses Bridges (Passamaquoddy, 1962-2017) – as well as the rivers, forests, animals, and coastline that define the ecology of the region, students will engage in discussions about how humans can be stewards of the local ecosystem and how non-Native Maine citizens can listen to, learn from, and amplify the voices of Wabanaki neighbors to assist in the future of a sustainable environment.

Lesson Plan

Portland History: "My Lost Youth" - Longfellow's Portland, Then and Now

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow loved his boyhood home of Portland, Maine. Born on Fore Street, the family moved to his maternal grandparents' home on Congress Street when Henry was eight months old. While he would go on to Bowdoin College and travel extensively abroad, ultimately living most of his adult years in Cambridge, Massachusetts, he never forgot his beloved Portland. Years after his childhood, in 1855, he wrote "My Lost Youth" about his undiminished love for and memories of growing up in Portland. This exhibit, using the poem as its focus, will present the Portland of Longfellow's boyhood. In many cases the old photos will be followed by contemporary images of what that site looked like 2004. Following the exhibit of 68 slides are five suggested lessons that can be adapted for any grade level, 3–12.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: Celebrity's Picture - Using Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's Portraits to Observe Historic Changes

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
"In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American book?" Englishman Sydney Smith's 1820 sneer irked Americans, especially writers such as Irving, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Maine's John Neal, until Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's resounding popularity successfully rebuffed the question. The Bowdoin educated Portland native became the America's first superstar poet, paradoxically loved especially in Britain, even memorialized at Westminster Abbey. He achieved international celebrity with about forty books or translations to his credit between 1830 and 1884, and, like superstars today, his public craved pictures of him. His publishers consequently commissioned Longfellow's portrait more often than his family, and he sat for dozens of original paintings, drawings, and photos during his lifetime, as well as sculptures. Engravers and lithographers printed replicas of the originals as book frontispiece, as illustrations for magazine or newspaper articles, and as post cards or "cabinet" cards handed out to admirers, often autographed. After the poet's death, illustrators continued commercial production of his image for new editions of his writings and coloring books or games such as "Authors," and sculptors commemorated him with busts in Longfellow Schools or full-length figures in town squares. On the simple basis of quantity, the number of reproductions of the Maine native's image arguably marks him as the country's best-known nineteenth century writer. TEACHERS can use this presentation to discuss these themes in art, history, English, or humanities classes, or to lead into the following LESSON PLANS. The plans aim for any 9-12 high school studio art class, but they can also be used in any humanities course, such as literature or history. They can be adapted readily for grades 3-8 as well by modifying instructional language, evaluation rubrics, and targeted Maine Learning Results and by selecting materials for appropriate age level.