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Keywords: Ash trees

Historical Items

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Item 27013

Big Tree section, Islesboro, ca. 1936

Contributed by: Islesboro Historical Society Date: circa 1936 Location: Islesboro Media: Ash wood

Item 27053

Big Tree, Islesboro, ca. 1920

Contributed by: Islesboro Historical Society Date: circa 1920 Location: Islesboro Media: Photographic print

Item 108787

kči-čči (The Great Penetrating Arrow), by James Eric Francis Sr., 2019

Contributed by: Hudson Museum, Univ. of Maine Date: circa 2019 Location: Old Town Media: Acrylic on canvas

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Holding up the Sky: Wabanaki people, culture, history, and art

Learn about Native diplomacy and obligation by exploring 13,000 years of Wabanaki residence in Maine through 17th century treaties, historic items, and contemporary artworks—from ash baskets to high fashion. Wabanaki voices contextualize present-day relevance and repercussions of 400 years of shared histories between Wabanakis and settlers to their region.

Exhibit

Gifts From Gluskabe: Maine Indian Artforms

According to legend, the Great Spirit created Gluskabe, who shaped the world of the Native People of Maine, and taught them how to use and respect the land and the resources around them. This exhibit celebrates the gifts of Gluskabe with Maine Indian art works from the early nineteenth to mid twentieth centuries.

Exhibit

Gluskap of the Wabanaki

Creation and other cultural tales are important to framing a culture's beliefs and values -- and passing those on. The Wabanaki -- Maliseet, Micmac, Passamaquoddy and Penobscot -- Indians of Maine and Nova Scotia tell stories of a cultural hero/creator, a giant who lived among them and who promised to return.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Wood Ashes or Gold Dust?

Both pot-ash and pearl-ash were worth more than any other product a farmer could produce, and large quantities were shipped from Hallowell until the…

Site Page

Presque Isle: The Star City - Harvesting Potatoes - Page 5 of 13

Baskets were made locally, usually by Native Americans. The strips of wood used to make these baskets came from ash trees.

Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - Stephen Titcomb and the Settlement of the Sandy River Valley

… of a fireplace screen were recovered from the ashes. Fireplace HardwareFarmington Historical Society The influence of the Titcomb family is…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Wikpiyik: The Basket Tree
by Darren Ranco

Countering the Emerald Ash Borer with Wabanaki Ecological Knowledge

Story

Why environmental advocacy is critical for making baskets
by Jennifer Sapiel Neptune

My advocacy work for the Maine Indian Basketmakers Alliance

Story

The Tomah Basket
by James Boyce

Learning to make Maliseet Tomah baskets

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Out of Ash

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will give middle and high school students a broad overview of the ash tree population in North America, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) threatening it, and the importance of the ash tree to the Wabanaki people in Maine. Students will look at Wabanaki oral histories as well as the geological/glacial beginnings of the region we now know as Maine for a general understanding of how the ash tree came to be a significant part of Wabanaki cultural history and environmental history in Maine. Students will compare national measures to combat the EAB to the Wabanaki-led Ash Task Force’s approaches in Maine, will discuss the benefits and challenges of biological control of invasive species, the concept of climigration, the concepts of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and how research scientists arrive at best practices for aiding the environment.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Stewarding Natural Resources

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce elementary-grade students to the concepts and importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK), taught and understood through oral history to generations of Wabanaki people. Students will engage in discussions about how humans can be stewards of the local ecosystem, and how non-Native Maine citizens can listen to, learn from, and amplify the voices of Wabanaki neighbors to assist in the future of a sustainable environment. Students will learn about Wabanaki artists, teachers, and leaders from the past and present to help contextualize the concepts and ideas in this lesson, and learn about how Wabanaki youth are carrying tradition forward into the future.