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Keywords: Aroostook County

Historical Items

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Item 13336

Photographic study in Aroostook County

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum Date: circa 1895 Media: Photographic print

Item 22566

Pearce description of Aroostook County, ca. 1840

Contributed by: Cary Library Date: circa 1850 Location: Houlton Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 15608

Moose in the Aroostook Woods, 1895

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum Date: circa 1895 Media: Photographic print

Architecture & Landscape

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Item 109427

Additions and Alterations at Aroostook County Courthouse, Houlton, 1927-1944

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1927–1944 Location: Houlton Client: Aroostook County Architect: Harry S. Coombs; Coombs and Harriman

Online Exhibits

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Exhibit

Aroostook County Railroads

Construction of the Bangor and Aroostook rail lines into northern Aroostook County in the early twentieth century opened the region to tourism and commerce from the south.

Exhibit

Shepard Cary: Lumberman, Legislator, Leader and Legend

Shepard Cary (1805-1866) was one of the leading -- and wealthiest -- residents of early Aroostook County. He was a lumberman, merchant, mill operator, and legislator.

Exhibit

Sagadahoc County through the Eastern Eye

The Eastern Illustrating and Publishing Company of Belfast, Maine. employed photographers who traveled by company vehicle through New England each summer, taking pictures of towns and cities, vacation spots and tourist attractions, working waterfronts and local industries, and other subjects postcard recipients might enjoy. The cards were printed by the millions in Belfast into the 1940s.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Presque Isle: The Star City - Birds Eye mobil combine, Aroostook County, ca. 1960

Birds Eye mobil combine, Aroostook County, ca. 1960 Contributed by Oakfield Historical Society Description A Birdseye mobil combine for…

Site Page

Presque Isle: The Star City - Loading sugar beets, Aroostook County, ca. 1975

In the 1970s, potato farmers in Aroostook County grew sugar beets as a rotation crop with potatoes. While a promising concept, scheduling problems…

My Maine Stories

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Story

Growing up on a potato and dairy farm
by Paula Woodworth

Life growing up and working on a potato and dairy farm was hard work but fun in Aroostook County.

Story

Aroostook Potato Harvest: Perspective of a Six Year Old
by Phyllis A. Blackstone

A child's memory of potato harvest in the 1950s

Story

The stories my parents told
by Henry Gartley

Stories from my immigrant parents, WWII, and my love of history.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: "Evangeline: A Tale of Acadie"--Selected Lines and Illustrations

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies, Visual & Performing Arts
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Maine's native son, is the epitome of Victorian Romanticism. Aroostook County is well acquainted with Longfellow's epic poem, Evangeline, because it is the story of the plight of the Acadians, who were deported from Acadie between 1755 and 1760. The descendants of these hard-working people inhabit much of Maine, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia. The students enjoy hearing the story and seeing the ink drawings. The illustrations are my interpretations. The collection took approximately two months to complete. The illustrations are presented in a Victorian-style folio, reminiscent of the family gathered in the parlor for a Sunday afternoon reading of Evangeline, which was published in 1847. Preparation Required/Preliminary Discussion: Have students read "Evangeline A Tale of Acadie". Give a background of the Acadia Diaspora. Suggested Follow-up Activities: Students could illustrate their own poems, as well as other Longfellow poems, such as: "Paul Revere's Ride," "The Village Blacksmith," or "The Children's Hour." "Tales of the Wayside Inn" is a colonial Canterbury Tales. The guest of the inn each tell stories. Student could write or illustrate their own characters or stories. Appropriate calligraphy assignments could include short poems and captions for their illustrations. Inks, pastels, watercolors, and colored pencils would be other appropriate illustrative media that could be applicable to other illustrated poems and stories. Each illustration in this exhibit was made in India ink on file folder paper. The dimensions, including the burgundy-colors mat, are 9" x 12". A friend made the calligraphy.