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Keywords: April

Historical Items

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Item 15878

Springvale After Great Fire, April 14, 1905

Contributed by: Sanford-Springvale Historical Society Date: 1905-04-15 Location: Springvale Media: Print from Glass Negative

Item 15879

Springvale After the Great Fire, April 14, 1905

Contributed by: Sanford-Springvale Historical Society Date: 1905-04-15 Location: Springvale Media: Print from Glass Negative

Item 15880

Springvale After the Great Fire of April 14, 1905

Contributed by: Sanford-Springvale Historical Society Date: 1905-04-15 Location: Springvale Media: Print from Glass Negative

Exhibits

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Exhibit

Liberty Threatened: Maine in 1775

At Lexington and Concord, on April 19, 1775, British troops attempted to destroy munitions stored by American colonists. The battles were the opening salvos of the American Revolution. Shortly, the conflict would erupt in Maine.

Exhibit

Powering Pejepscot Paper Co.

In 1893, F.C. Whitehouse of Topsham, who owned paper mills in Topsham and Lisbon Falls, began construction of a third mill on the eastern banks of the Androscoggin River five miles north of Topsham. First, he had to build a dam to harness the river's power.

Exhibit

A Handwritten Community Newspaper

The eight issues of South Freeport's handwritten newspaper, distributed in 1859, provided "general interest and amusement" to the coastal community.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown - Madame Nordica concert poster, ca. 1897

… concert at the Coliseum in Richmond, Indiana, April 19, 1897. The year is not certain, but Nordica undertook a tour of the United States in 1897.

Site Page

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature - Green Mountain Railroad By: Spenser Simis

1885 Item 21317 infoAcadia National Park On April 29, 1883 the foundation work began on the Summit House.

Site Page

Biddeford History & Heritage Project - Judge George Thacher (1754-1824)

… that seemed to have been the hallmark of his life. After his death on April 6, 1824, Thacher was interred in Woodlawn Cemetery in Biddeford.

My Maine Stories

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Story

2020 Sheltering in Place Random Notes During COVID-19
by Phyllis Merriam, LCSW

Sheltering-in-Place personal experiences in mid-coast Maine (Rockland) during March and April 2020

Story

Wabanaki Fashion
by Decontie & Brown

Keeping the spirit and memories of our ancestors alive through fashion and creativity

Story

Nemo's Nightmare of World War I
by Mike and Bryan Luciano

Franklyn J. "Nemo" Burbank of Livermore Falls was our ancestor who fought in World War I.

Lesson Plans

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Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood and the Missouri Compromise

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise, and the far-reaching implications of Maine statehood and the Missouri Compromise such as the preservation and spread of slavery in the United States. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: The Missouri Compromise was deeply flawed and ultimately did more harm to the Union than good.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Maine Statehood

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
Maine's quest for statehood began in the years immediately following the American Revolution. Though the state of Massachusetts consented to the separation in 1819 and Maine would ultimately achieve statehood in 1820, Maine’s split from Massachusetts was not without controversy and was not universally supported by people living in Maine. Using primary sources, students will explore the arguments for and against Maine statehood. Students will gather evidence and arguments to debate the statement: It is in the best interests of the people of Maine for Maine to become its own state.

Lesson Plan

Longfellow Studies: The Elms - Stephen Longfellow's Gorham Farm

Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: English Language Arts, Social Studies
On April 3, 1761 Stephen Longfellow II signed the deed for the first 100 acre purchase of land that he would own in Gorham, Maine. His son Stephen III (Judge Longfellow) would build a home on that property which still stands to this day. Judge Longfellow would become one of the most prominent citizens in Gorham’s history and one of the earliest influences on his grandson Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's work as a poet. This exhibit examines why the Longfellows arrived in Gorham, Judge Longfellow's role in the history of the town, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's vacations in the country which may have influenced his greatest work, and the remains of the Longfellow estate still standing in Gorham today.