Search Results

Keywords: Abenaki

Historical Items

View All Showing 2 of 81 Showing 3 of 81

Item 9213

Derivations of the name Peter Paul within the Abenaki community, 1960

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society Date: 1960-06-13 Location: Woodstock Media: Ink on paper

  view a full transcription

Item 14426

Bell-shaped Sewing Basket

Contributed by: Abbe Museum Date: circa 1981 Location: Odanak Media: Ash, sweetgrass

Item 14424

Sewing Basket, ca. 1980

Contributed by: Abbe Museum Date: circa 1980 Location: Odanak Media: Ash, sweetgrass, dye

Exhibits

View All Showing 2 of 10 Showing 3 of 10

Exhibit

Indians, Furs, and Economics

When Europeans arrived in North America and disrupted traditional Native American patterns of life, they also offered other opportunities: trade goods for furs. The fur trade had mixed results for the Wabanaki.

Exhibit

Father Rasles, the Indians and the English

Father Sebastien Rasle, a French Jesuit, ran a mission for Indians at Norridgewock and, many English settlers believed, encouraged Indian resistance to English settlement. He was killed in a raid on the mission in 1724 that resulted in the remaining Indians fleeing for Canada.

Exhibit

Umbazooksus & Beyond

Visitors to the Maine woods in the early twentieth century often recorded their adventures in private diaries or journals and in photographs. Their remembrances of canoeing, camping, hunting and fishing helped equate Maine with wilderness.

Site Pages

View All Showing 2 of 13 Showing 3 of 13

Site Page

Skowhegan Community History - Abenakis in the Norridgewock/Skowhegan Area

The Abenakis believed that the lands were there to share, and to hunt on, as needed to live but the English wanted to own it and keep anyone off that…

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Meeting at Koussinok

… harvests, hoping to establish trade with the Abenaki people. About 40 miles from the ocean, when they reached the last point of navigation on the…

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Industry on Bombahook

… called Bombahook by its original occupants, the Abenaki Indians. Another belief is that Sheppard's Point at the end of the stream is shaped like…

My Maine Stories

View All Showing 2 of 2 Showing 2 of 2

Story

Mali Agat (Molly Ockett) the famous Wabanaki "Doctress"
by Maine Historical Society

Pigwacket Molly Ockett, healing, and cultural ecological knowledge

Story

Margaret Moxa's Blanket Coat
by Jennifer Neptune

A contemporary artwork in memory of Penobscots murdered for scalp bounties.

Lesson Plans

View All Showing 2 of 3 Showing 3 of 3

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Nation to Nation: Treaties and Legislation between the Wabanaki Nations and the State of Maine

Grade Level: 9-12 Content Area: Social Studies
This lesson plan asks high school students to think critically about and look closely at documentation regarding the Nation-to-Nation relationship between the Wabanaki Tribes/Nations and the State of Maine. This lesson asks students to participate in discussions about morality and legislative actions over time. Students will gain experience examining and responding to primary and secondary sources by taking a close look at documents relating to the Maine Indian Claims Settlement Act of 1980 (MICSA) and the issues that preceded and have followed the Act.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Out of Ash

Grade Level: 3-5, 6-8, 9-12 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will give middle and high school students a broad overview of the ash tree population in North America, the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) threatening it, and the importance of the ash tree to the Wabanaki people in Maine. Students will look at Wabanaki oral histories as well as the geological/glacial beginnings of the region we now know as Maine for a general understanding of how the ash tree came to be a significant part of Wabanaki cultural history and environmental history in Maine. Students will compare national measures to combat the EAB to the Wabanaki-led Ash Task Force’s approaches in Maine, will discuss the benefits and challenges of biological control of invasive species, the concept of climigration, the concepts of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK) and how research scientists arrive at best practices for aiding the environment.

Lesson Plan

Bicentennial Lesson Plan

Wabanaki Studies: Stewarding Natural Resources

Grade Level: 3-5 Content Area: Science & Engineering, Social Studies
This lesson plan will introduce elementary-grade students to the concepts and importance of Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and Indigenous Knowledge (IK), taught and understood through oral history to generations of Wabanaki people. Students will engage in discussions about how humans can be stewards of the local ecosystem, and how non-Native Maine citizens can listen to, learn from, and amplify the voices of Wabanaki neighbors to assist in the future of a sustainable environment. Students will learn about Wabanaki artists, teachers, and leaders from the past and present to help contextualize the concepts and ideas in this lesson, and learn about how Wabanaki youth are carrying tradition forward into the future.