Exhibits

Maine Memory Network is featuring these online exhibits. You also can view all of the site's exhibits, view a timeline of selected events in Maine History, and learn how to create your own exhibit.

Al Nutting inspecting Norway pine, Troy, ca. 1950

Al Nutting inspecting Norway pine, Troy, ca. 1950

The Establishment of the Troy Town Forest

Seavey Piper, a selectman, farmer, landowner, and leader of the Town of Troy in the 1920s through the early 1950s helped establish a town forest on abandoned farm land in Troy. The exhibit details his work over ten years. Read on.

Mobil Oil blimp above Portland, ca. 1930

Mobil Oil blimp above Portland, ca. 1930

Eye in the Sky

In 1921, Guy Gannett purchased two competing Portland newspapers, merging them under the Portland Press Herald title. He followed in 1925 with the purchase the Portland Evening Express, which allowed him to combine two passions: photography and aviation. Read on.

Baxter Boulevard, Portland,  ca. 1938

Baxter Boulevard, Portland, ca. 1938

WWI Memorial Trees along Portland's Baxter Boulevard

On Memorial Day of 1920, the City of Portland planted 100 Linden trees on Forest Avenue, each dedicated to the memory of one military service member who had died in World War I, or who had served honorably. Read on.

Carl A. Garris Jr. with lobsters, Portland, 1926

Carl A. Garris Jr. with lobsters, Portland, 1926

Maine Eats: the food revolution starts here

From Maine's iconic lobsters, blueberries, potatoes, apples, and maple syrup, to local favorites like poutine, baked beans, red hot dogs, Italian sandwiches, and Whoopie Pies, Maine's identity and economy are inextricably linked to food. Sourcing food, preparing food, and eating food are all part of the heartbeat of Maine's culture and economy. Now, a food revolution is taking us back to our roots in Maine: to the traditional sources, preparation, and pleasures of eating food that have sustained Mainers for millennia. Read on.

Fort Sullivan barracks, Eastport, 2018

Fort Sullivan barracks, Eastport, 2018

The British capture and occupation of Eastport 1814-1818

The War of 1812 ended in December 1814, but Eastport continued to be under British control for another four years. Eastport was the last American territory occupied by the British from the War of 1812 to be returned to the United States. Except for the brief capture of two Aleutian Islands in Alaska by the Japanese in World War II, it was the last time since 2018 that United States soil was occupied by a foreign government. Read on.

Spruce gum box, Washburn, ca. 1920

Spruce gum box, Washburn, ca. 1920

Maine Sweets: Confections and Confectioners

From chocolate to taffy, Mainers are inventive with our sweet treats. In addition to feeding our sweet tooth, it's also an economic driver for the state. Read on.

Fight or buy bonds, World War I poster, 1917

Fight or buy bonds, World War I poster, 1917

World War I and the Maine Experience

With a long history of patriotism and service, Maine experienced the war in a truly distinct way. Its individual experiences tell the story of not only what it means to be an American, but what it means to be from Maine during the war to end all wars. Read on.

Focus On...

Mercy Hospital

Frances Tryon, Portland, 1946

The Story of Mercy Hospital began in the fall of 1918, with one of the greatest health crisis in the city's history, the pandemic known as the Spanish Influenza. This emergency, along with limited proper hospital facilities in the Portland area, prompted Bishop Walsh to enlist the help of the Sisters of Mercy. This relationship launched Mercy Hospital's commitment to the greater Portland community, through compassionate and high-quality healthcare. Read on.

John Martin: Expert Observer

John Martin in Spanish cloak, Bangor, 1846

John Martin (1823-1904) of Bangor began in 1864 looking back at his life, family, business and recreational experiences and recording those events and thoughts -- with narrative and illustrations -- for his children. Martin called himself an "expert accountant," but he was interested in architecture, dance, fashion, gardening, politics, business, religion, and the world around him. Read on.

Home: The Wadsworth-Longfellow House and Portland

Wadsworth-Longfellow House and Store, 1882

When Peleg Wadsworth built his house in 1785, what is now Congress Street in Portland was on the rural outskirts of the community known as Falmouth. The house passed on to other family members and Portland changed around what remained a family home until 1901, when it became a historic house museum. Read on.

Maine and the Civil War

Sgt. Nelson W. Jones, 3rd Maine Infantry, ca. 1862

Maine's participation in the Civil War is legendary: heroes and heroines, a huge per capita participation rate, nurses, and homefront activities, as well as post-war remembrances. These pages pull together resources from Maine Memory Network and Maine History Online that explore and illuminate aspects of Maine and the Civil War. Read on.

More Maine Memory Exhibits