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Buttons, Hats and Music: Campaign 1964

This slideshow contains 11 items
1
We Want A Woman In The White House

We Want A Woman In The White House

Item 12229 info
Margaret Chase Smith Library

While Senator Margaret Chase Smith's campaign for the 1964 Republican nomination for president was rather low-key, some of the support she generated was based on her being a woman -- the first woman from one of the two major political parties to seek the nomination.

One unusual piece of campaign paraphernalia was the song Bucky Searles and Dick Nirenberg wrote, "We Want a Woman in the White House."

The lyrics mention Smith's desire for peace and the historic nature of her candidacy.


2
Margaret Chase Smith, Hat to Toss in Ring, 1964

Margaret Chase Smith, Hat to Toss in Ring, 1964

Item 25878 info
Margaret Chase Smith Library

Theodore Roosevelt is credited with turning the phrase "toss my hat in the ring" into a statement of political candidacy.

In 1964, numerous hat makers capitalized on the phrase and sent Margaret Chase Smith hats that she could figuratively toss into the ring to declare her candidacy for president.


3
Margaret Chase Smith and Hildegarde, 1964

Margaret Chase Smith and Hildegarde, 1964

Item 25854 info
Margaret Chase Smith Library

Gender was an issue throughout Smith's short run for the presidency.

Gladys Shelley's song "Leave it to the Girls" became a tribute to Smith's candidacy.

Shelley, a prolific songwriter, mostly wrote for Tin Pan Alley and New York cabarets.

To celebrate Smith's nomination at the Republican Convention in San Francisco in July 1964, singer Hildegard (Loretta Sell) performed the song.


4
Recording of Leave It to The Girls, 1964

Recording of Leave It to The Girls, 1964

Item 25849 info
Margaret Chase Smith Library

Among the lyrics to Leave it to the Girls, are the lines:

"But leave it to the girls

They're heaven sent

It could be that our next president

Will wear perfume and pearls

Be diplomatic in pin curls

For love and glory leave it to the girls!"

Click play button to listen to recording


5
Horn, 1964 Republican National Convention

Horn, 1964 Republican National Convention

Item 25955 info
Margaret Chase Smith Library

Political conventions are part pep rally, part serious debate over issues, and part preparation for campaigns.

Traditionally, candidates are not present when their names are put into nomination. Smith, nominated by Vermont Sen. George Aiken, wanted to be present and enjoy the celebration.

The air horn is a souvenir from that event.


6
1964 Republican National Convention Souvenir

1964 Republican National Convention Souvenir

Item 25953 info
Margaret Chase Smith Library

Another unusual souvenir from the convention is a "Tooti Bag" with "M.C. Smith 64" stamped on the yellow tag.

The bag is filled with granulated crystalline silicon dioxide and can be heated and used as a heating pad.


7
Margaret Chase Smith for President Souvenir

Margaret Chase Smith for President Souvenir

Item 25919 info
Margaret Chase Smith Library

While the Tooti Bag was a generic souvenir personalized for a particular candidate, the rose was emblematic of Margaret Chase Smith.

Smith was known for wearing a fresh rose every day -- along with pearls.

When she announced her candidacy for president, she even commented on the freshness of the rose she wore.


8
Margaret Chase Smith for President Campaign Button, 1964

Margaret Chase Smith for President Campaign Button, 1964

Item 25915 info
Margaret Chase Smith Library

Campaign buttons have long been a staple of American politics, and often feature an image of the candidate.

A variety of button styles promoted Smith's candidacy, including this one with images of elephant heads to show her party affiliation.


9
Margaret Chase Smith Campaign Button, 1964

Margaret Chase Smith Campaign Button, 1964

Item 25958 info
Margaret Chase Smith Library

A more unusual style of campaign button features no photograph of Smith and no bold printing of her name.

Instead, it shows the emblematic rose and her script signature, both clearly suggesting femininity.


10
Margaret Chase Smith Campaign Poster, 1964

Margaret Chase Smith Campaign Poster, 1964

Item 25867 info
Margaret Chase Smith Library

A campaign poster for Smith was quite straightforward.

It contains no slogan.

A large photograph, her name and the office sought are the extent of the clear message.


11
Guest pass, 1964 Republican National Convention

Guest pass, 1964 Republican National Convention

Item 25875 info
Margaret Chase Smith Library

Another piece of memorabilia from the 1964 Republican National Convention at the Cow Palace in San Francisco in July 1964 is the guest pass.

The pass includes perforated tickets for the first and second sessions of the day and was for Friday, July 17, two days after Barry Goldwater was nominated.


This slideshow contains 11 items
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