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Mottoes And Memories

This Exhibit Contains 9 Items
1
Arbor Day Program, Farmington State Normal School, 1887

Arbor Day Program, Farmington State Normal School, 1887

Item 69265 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Arbor Day was first observed at Farmington State Normal School in 1886 and became a long-standing tradition. Arbor Day exercises included speeches, readings, poetry, music, the singing of the class ode, and planting the class tree by the graduating class. Each class chose the type of tree it wanted to plant. This program is for the second annual Arbor Day Celebration at F.S.N.S., held on May 10,1887.


2
Motto book page, Farmington State Normal School, 1886

Motto book page, Farmington State Normal School, 1886

Item 68685 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Memorizing mottoes was a long-standing tradition in early American education and was practiced at F.S.N.S. from the 1880s to the 1940s. Each school day opened with Morning Chapel exercises that included a short religious program, school announcements, and the quotation to be memorized by the students.

The students recorded all their daily mottoes in a notebook, known as their "motto book." These quotes or parts of poems were intended to inspire students to work hard, develop a good moral character, be successful students, and be good citizens. This is a page from the 1886-87 motto book of F.S.N.S. student Dora Bither.


3
Motto book page, Farmington State Normal School, 1912

Motto book page, Farmington State Normal School, 1912

Item 68722 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Principal Wilbert G. Mallett was especially fond of the motto tradition and continued it for the 39 years he served as the F.S.N.S. leader. The students were required to memorize inspirational quotes, which promoted hard work, good moral values and the value of education.

When he retired in 1940, students gave Mr. Mallett a bound volume of mottoes entitled "Mottoes Remembered" as a parting gift.

This is a page from the motto book of Edna Havey, who was a student at the school, graduating in 1914. Miss Havey returned to teach at the school from 1919 to 1947.


4
Farmington State Normal School Hymn Painting, ca. 1914

Farmington State Normal School Hymn Painting, ca. 1914

Item 68361 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Alice Ruth Mullen, class of 1914, presented this hand-painted school hymn to Normal School teacher Carolyn Stone.

Lillian Lincoln wrote the hymn, "O Mother Normal," and several other schooll songs during the history of Farmington State Normal School, now known as University of Maine at Farmington.

Like other school songs, it touts loyalty and pride and takes the form of new lyrics for an existing tune. "O Mother Normal" is sung to the tune of "To Thee, O Country."

Miss Lincoln also wrote a song "Memories" in 1925 about her time at the school.


5
Christian Youth Association senior cabinet, Farmington State Normal School, 1921

Christian Youth Association senior cabinet, Farmington State Normal School, 1921

Item 68441 info
Mantor Library at UMF

The F.S.N.S. student organization with the longest history was the Christian Association. Active as early as 1886, it played a significant role on campus for many years and had regular Thursday meetings during much of its history. It also raised funds for worthy causes, hosted an annual fair, dances and teas, and supported the school's medicine chest and a reading table featuring popular magazines of the day.

In 1921, membership included ninety percent of the student body. This 1921 Senior Cabinet includes President Bertha Robinson (middle) Front row: Doris Brown, Hortense Mackay, Joyce Ames, Christine Hunser. Back row: Arline Coffin, Addie Reed, Frances Goodwin, Thelma Lawrence and Julia Cox.


6
Patriotism Pageant program, Farmington State Normal School, June 20, 1917

Patriotism Pageant program, Farmington State Normal School, June 20, 1917

Item 69635 info
Mantor Library at UMF

F.S.N.S. hosted a Patriotic Pageant in Merrill Hall on June 20, 1917. The play, put on by the graduating class of 1917, depicted famous scenes of American history such as the life of George Washington, the days of the Revolution, the activities of Nathan Hale, and Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address.

Benefit concerts and other activities continued at F.S.N.S. throughout the war years. Miss Stone organized the students into teams of 20 girls, each led by a teacher, for Red Cross work. They made pillows and clothing, knit bandages and sold baked goods to raise funds for war relief.

Some industrious students collected and resold old magazines and newspapers; others offered hair shampooing (10 cents) or shoe shines (3 cents) to raise money for Red Cross. The students donated 5,010 items to the Red Cross between April 17, 1917 and Sept 20, 1919 for the benefit of the victims of the Great War.


7
Cadet Teaching Brochure, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1944

Cadet Teaching Brochure, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1944

Item 68910 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Due to a serious teacher shortage in the 1940s, the Maine Department of Education devised a Cadet Teaching Program to help fill the need for teachers in rural schools which might otherwise be forced to close. Cadet Teaching Centers were established throughout Maine and students from the State's Normal Schools participated in the program.

F.S.N.S. Seniors were involved from 1942 - 1946, working under the supervision of a traveling Critic Teacher. In 1943, "Cadets" were assigned placements through centers in Bingham, Guilford, Turner Center, New Portland. By 1944, they worked through centers in Kingfield and Norridgewock and 70 Cadets were in Maine schools that year.

According to the college newspaper, teaching in far flung rural schools with only sporadic visits from a supervisor proved quite challenging: one Cadet, after a series of road-closing blizzards, had to travel to her classroom by horse and sleigh, and another faced a balky woodstove that filled her classroom with smoke.


8
Farmington State Normal School General Rules, c. 1924

Farmington State Normal School General Rules, c. 1924

Item 68357 info
Mantor Library at UMF

F.S.N.S. students were expected to abide by the school's rules and follow accepted social convention of the time. To aid them, the school provided students with a copy of the General Rules originally established in 1919, that outlined unacceptable and expected behaviors during the school day and while in the residence hall. A description of student government is also included.

The first student council was formed in 1921. It was established by Principal W.G. Mallett in a effort to enlist students cooperation in dealing with rule-breaking and other student issues.


9
Suggestions for Students, Farmington State Teachers College, 1951

Suggestions for Students, Farmington State Teachers College, 1951

Item 69266 info
Mantor Library at UMF

Social etiquette and good manners were an important aspect of daily life in the 1920s-1950s. F.S.N.S. offered etiquette training for women in the 1930s, which covered how to be a good hostess, create good conversation, walk with poise, sit gracefully and stand properly.

Carolyn Stone often taught etiquette to the students at the time. In the 1940s, the school had a Social Training Committee which hosted teas and dances that gave students a chance to practice their social skills.

To prepare students to dress properly, a significant part of good etiquette, the Home Economics Department prepared this "Suggestions for Students" in the 1950s, which listed clothing to bring as well as bedding and other necessities for the dorm room. It also specified required clothing for Home Ec students, socks for physical education, and dinner dresses for formal dining.


This Exhibit Contains 9 Items