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Reading, Writing and 'Rithmetic: Brooklin Schools

This slideshow contains 14 items
1
Hale's Corner School, Brooklin, 1898

Hale's Corner School, Brooklin, 1898

Item 13576 info
Sedgwick-Brooklin Historical Society

When Brooklin was incorporated in 1849, the town had ten school districts and nine one-room schoolhouses.

In 1900, there were still nine one-room grammar school buildings throughout Brooklin with each school and school district numbered.

The little neighborhood schools made it possible for every child to walk to and from school and to go home for lunch.

Hale's Corner School (sometimes called Hale's Hill School) was one of the earliest schools, located at the intersection of High Street and what is now Route 175. That school no longer exists.

Another rural school was # 7, located on River Road. It closed in 1942; the building still stands, used for storage.

The early schools had no electricity; light came from the windows or kerosene lanterns (a potential fire hazard).
Heat would be from a wood-burning stove. Before wood was part of the town's school budget, parents would be expected to contribute wood to keep the school house warm.
Because of the lack of transportation and to save on expenses, teachers often boarded with families close to the school in which they were teaching.


2
First Brooklin High School 1901

First Brooklin High School 1901

Item 13535 info
Sedgwick-Brooklin Historical Society

The first Brooklin High School was built in 1897 and the first graduation took place in 1908.

Frank McGouldrick, Superintendent of Schools, noted in his 1908 school report to the town that it would be necessary to pay teachers $10 per week to attract good teachers.


3
First Brooklin High School in 1901

First Brooklin High School in 1901

Item 13575 info
Sedgwick-Brooklin Historical Society

The 1901 Brooklin High School Yearbook shows this picture of the new high school. It burned in 1916.

Many students had to walk five or six miles round trip to attend high school; in the winter, they often took short cuts across frozen fields.


4
Haven Grammar School, Brooklin

Haven Grammar School, Brooklin

Item 13531 info
Sedgwick-Brooklin Historical Society

The Haven Grammar School opened in 1853. It was located about a mile west of the Brooklin town center.

As the town's population changed, the school was closed in 1924 and sold for $740. The students were combined with those attending the Village (Corner) School near Brooklin Center.

The building was a gift shop for many years, run by Millie Bridges. Next it became an antique shop; presently the building is privately owned as a guest cottage.


5
West Brooklin Elementary School

West Brooklin Elementary School

Item 13543 info
Sedgwick-Brooklin Historical Society

Elementary school #5 was located in West Brooklin, across from the Rock Bound Chapel.

In 1921, the teacher was Miss Gaynell Missouri Bridges:

Some of the students were: Flossie Day, Omar Friend, Ray Carter, Mabel Chatto, Ray Friend and Maud Friend Austin.

The school closed in the early 1940s and is now a private residence.

For light, there was only daylight. Robert Tapley, a former student, said, "On dark days you couldn't see the blackboards on the other side of the room. All the windows were on one side and on the back...on the other side of the room...were blackboards. If you were sitting by the window, you couldn't see what was on the blackboard!"

In 1930, state law specified how lighting should be controlled in a school: light should be arranged that any child would face the light, meaning light could come only from the left or left and rear with no windows on a student to the right or front of the room. This was very hard for the small school houses to comply with.


6
West Brooklin School, ca. 1929

West Brooklin School, ca. 1929

Item 13542 info
Sedgwick-Brooklin Historical Society

A West Brooklin School picture from 1929-1930.

Until 1909, all the rural schools in Brooklin were ungraded; students might range in age from five to 17 with teachers handling the different subjects for all eight grades.

By the fall of 1910, the schools were graded first through eighth.

Robert Tapley said, " [There were] twelve, fifteen [students] perhaps. When the teacher had her classes - her desk was down by the door when you came in - all seats went to the back, and they were graduated in size. As you got older, you sat in the back. . . All the classes were held up in front by her desk; there would be two or three in a class. Sometimes she probably had a couple of grades for English, spelling, whatever. There wasn't much distinction between classes, really."


7
Brooklin Village School, circa 1948

Brooklin Village School, circa 1948

Item 13541 info
Sedgwick-Brooklin Historical Society

In 1917, the town combined schools and created graded classrooms. The Haven School (#2) and the Corner School (#8) were combined to form the Brooklin Graded Schools, which encompassed both buildings.

Older grades from the Brooklin/Haven area were located in the downstairs of the new high school built in 1917.

In 1928, a new Brooklin Village School was built. As the costs of maintaining many one-room schools rose, many were closed or consolidated. The Village School was near the town center. It had two rooms, one for the primary grades and the other for the intermediate grades; there were three grades in each room.

Electricity was installed in 1938. This photo is about 1948. By 1968, more space was need and an additional room was added. This building continued to be used as an elementary school until it was closed in June 1995 and the new Brooklin School was opened.

The former grammar school is now the Brooklin Town Hall.


8
Brooklin Corner School Group

Brooklin Corner School Group

Item 13530 info
Sedgwick-Brooklin Historical Society

A Brooklin Corner School picture from early 1930s. As noted, the Haven School was combined with the Corner School by 1917.

The Naskeag School, #1, was another rural Brooklin school, located about five miles from the Corner.

Cynthia Keefe remembered teaching there about 1935 for $13 a week and boarding with the Candage family from Sunday evening to Friday, with transportation provided by a neighbor.


9
Ada Herrick, Brooklin, ca. 1945

Ada Herrick, Brooklin, ca. 1945

Item 13546 info
Sedgwick-Brooklin Historical Society

Ada Herrick was a beloved primary school teacher in Brooklin for almost 50 years -- teaching three generations of Brooklin scholars. She taught first through third grades at the Brooklin Village School.


10
Brooklin High School, 1927

Brooklin High School, 1927

Item 13537 info
Sedgwick-Brooklin Historical Society

In 1917, the second Brooklin High School was built at the same location as the original high school.

In 1929, a road was built in front so cars could drive up to the school. Then, in 1930, this high school also burned.


11
Brooklin High School student group, 1930

Brooklin High School student group, 1930

Item 13533 info
Sedgwick-Brooklin Historical Society

A Brooklin High School group picture, just prior to the 1930 fire that destroyed the school.


12
Temporary High School

Temporary High School

Item 13538 info
Sedgwick-Brooklin Historical Society

During the time the high school was being rebuilt -- for the third time and on the original site -- the building to the right of the Baptist Church was used as a temporary school.

The church was located at the Brooklin Center, across from the Brooklin General Store.


13
Third Brooklin High School

Third Brooklin High School

Item 13544 info
Sedgwick-Brooklin Historical Society

In 1932, the new Brooklin High School was opened.

Elementary grades were held in the basement and junior high grades were on the first floor.

In 1969, the building became the Junior High School. The high school students then went to either Deer Isle High School or George Stevens High School in Blue Hill.


14
Third Brooklin High School 1932

Third Brooklin High School 1932

Item 13540 info
Sedgwick-Brooklin Historical Society

Brooklin High School was used as the Junior High School from 1969 to 1995. At that time, the new Brooklin School was opened and the old Junior High was sold to Steve White, who also owned the Brooklin Boat Yard. Several businesses relating to boating are now located in the building.


Bibliography:
Brooklin Annual Reports, Brooklin, ME, 1898, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1914, 1915, 1919, 1921, 1931. 1946.
Carter, Bryle. Personal Interview, Brooklin. 7/15/95
Keefe, Cynthia. Personal Interview, Brooklin. 7/21/95
Tapley, Robert. Personal Interview. Brooklin, 7/19/95
White, Kimberly Tyler. "Excerpts from History of Brooklin Schools 1949-1993." Brooklin School Dedication. Weekly Packet, Blue Hill. 11/2/95. pgs. 6-8.
William, Edmund. Personal Interview, Brooklin. 7/20/95
Centennial Celebration. Brooklin, Maine. July, 1949.


This slideshow contains 14 items