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Historical Items (33)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (3)  |  Sites (3)  |  My Maine Stories (0)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 33 View All

Item 36608

Title: Coopers' trade banner, Portland, 1841

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: 1841

Location: Portland

Media: Oil on linen

Item 36586

Title: Tailors trade banner, Portland, 1841

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: 1841

Location: Portland

Media: Oil on linen

Item 36583

Title: Ship Builders trade banner, Portland, 1841

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: 1841

Location: Portland

Media: Oil on linen

Exhibits Showing 3 of 3 View All

Exhibit

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Bakers and Confectioners trade banner, Portland, 1841

A Celebration of Skilled Artisans

The Maine Charitable Mechanic Association, an organization formed to promote and support skilled craftsmen, celebrated civic pride and members' trades with a parade through Portland on Oct. 8, 1841 at which they displayed 17 painted linen banners with graphic and textual representations of the artisans' skills.

Exhibit

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Sgt. Nelson W. Jones, 3rd Maine Infantry, ca. 1862

This Rebellion: Maine and the Civil War

For Mainers like many other people in both the North and the South, the Civil War, which lasted from 1861-1865, had a profound effect on their lives. Letters, artifacts, relics, and other items saved by participants at home and on the battlefield help illuminate the nature of the Civil War experience for Mainers.

Exhibit

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Khadija Guled, Portland, 2009

400 years of New Mainers

Immigration is one of the most contentious topics of debate in Maine. Controversy aside, immigration is also America's oldest tradition, and along with religious tolerance, what our nation was built upon. Since the first people—the Wabanaki—permitted Europeans to settle in the land now known as Maine, we have been a state of immigrants.

Sites Showing 3 of 3 View All

Site

Fales Edgarton House, Thomaston, ca. 1870

Thomaston: The Town that Went to Sea

The history of a town on the northern bank of the St. George River, as told by representatives from Thomaston Historical Society, Thomaston Public Library, Montpelier: the General Henry Knox Museum, and students from Georges Valley High School. Architecture, General Knox, the Civil War, the Great Depression, and the state prison are some of the topics covered.

Site

Mono Aircraft Company, Presque Isle, 1935

Presque Isle: The Star City

The history of a northern Maine community as told by an array of local institutions and organizations. Site contributors include University of Maine at Presque Isle, Presque Isle Historical Society, Mark and Emily Turner Memorial Library, Presque Isle Middle School. Some of the topics include historic buildings, potato farming, transportation and the Aroostook Valley Railroad.

Site

Welcome to Strong sign, Strong, ca. 1950

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village

The history of a small western Maine community north of Farmington as told by a team consisting of Strong Historical Society, Strong Elementary School, and Strong Public Library. Exhibit topics include Strong's prominence in the wood products industry (it was once the "Toothpick Capital of the World"), the "Bridge that Changed the Map," schools and educational history, clubs and organizations, "Fly Rod" Crosby, the first Maine guide, and a rich student section related to the Civil War and post-Civil War era in the town.