Maine Memory Network
Maine's Online Museum

Login · My Account · Show Album


 

 

Search Results

Keywords: washer


Search within these results  |  New Search  |  Advanced Search

Historical Items (8)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (4)  |  Sites (2)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 8 View All

Item 16482

Title: Washer and butter churn, Littleton, ca. 1942

Contributed by: Southern Aroostook Agricultural Museum

Date: circa 1942

Location: Littleton

Media: steel

Item 20160

Title: Clothes washer advertisement, Westbrook, 1873

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: 1873

Location: Westbrook

Media: Ink on paper

Item 14650

Title: Pulp washer, Eastern Manufacturing Co., Brewer

Contributed by: City of Brewer

Date: 1921

Location: Brewer

Media: Photograph

Exhibits Showing 3 of 4 View All

Exhibit

Notice of Daniel Webster death, Portland, 1852

A Riot of Words: Ballads, Posters, Proclamations and Broadsides

Imagine a day 150 years ago. Looking down a side street, you see the buildings are covered with posters and signs.

Exhibit

Raleigh Gilbert, Popham Colony, ca. 1607

Popham Colony

George Popham and a group of fellow Englishmen arrived at the mouth of the Kennebec River, hoping to trade with Native Americans, find gold and other valuable minerals, and discover a Northwest passage. In 18 months, the fledgling colony was gone.

Exhibit

Pepperell Manufacturing fire insurance map, 1929

Biddeford, Saco and the Textile Industry

The largest textile factory in the country reached seven stories up on the banks of the Saco River in 1825, ushering in more than a century of making cloth in Biddeford and Saco. Along with the industry came larger populations and commercial, retail, social, and cultural growth.

Sites Showing 2 of 2 View All

Site

Moving in, Eastern Maine Medical Center, Bangor, 1976

Eastern Maine Medical Center

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site

Welcome to Strong sign, Strong, ca. 1950

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village

The history of a small western Maine community north of Farmington as told by a team consisting of Strong Historical Society, Strong Elementary School, and Strong Public Library. Exhibit topics include Strong's prominence in the wood products industry (it was once the "Toothpick Capital of the World"), the "Bridge that Changed the Map," schools and educational history, clubs and organizations, "Fly Rod" Crosby, the first Maine guide, and a rich student section related to the Civil War and post-Civil War era in the town.