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Keywords: snowshoe clubs


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Historical Items (54)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (6)  |  Sites (5)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 54 View All

Item 33300

Title: Le Boucanier Snowshoe Club, Biddeford, 1927

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

Date: 1927-03-05

Location: Biddeford; Brunswick

Media: Glass negative

Item 25287

Title: Snowshoe club presidents, Quebec

Contributed by: Franco-American Collection

Date: circa 1940

Media: Photograph

Item 25290

Title: Jacques Cartier snowshoe club, ca. 1925

Contributed by: Franco-American Collection

Date: circa 1925

Location: Lewiston

Media: Photograph

Exhibits Showing 3 of 6 View All

Exhibit

Jacques Cartier snowshoe club, ca. 1925

Les Raquetteurs

In the early 1600s, French explorers and colonizers in the New World quickly adopted a Native American mode of transportation to get around during the harsh winter months: the snowshoe. Most Northern societies had some form of snowshoe, but the Native Americans turned it into a highly functional item. French settlers named snowshoes "raquettes" because they resembled the tennis racket then in use.

Exhibit

Mellie Dunham's dance band, Norway, ca. 1925

Remembering Mellie Dunham: Snowshoe Maker and Fiddler

Alanson Mellen "Mellie" Dunham and his wife Emma "Gram" Dunham were well-known musicians throughout Maine and the nation in the early decades of the 20th century. Mellie Dunham also received fame as a snowshoe maker.

Exhibit

Edith Knight Moulton, ca. 1900

The Arrival of Winter

The astronomical arrival of winter -- also known as the winter solstice -- marks the year's shortest day and the season of snow and cold. It usually arrives on December 21.

Sites Showing 3 of 5 View All

Site

Welcome to Strong sign, Strong, ca. 1950

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village

The history of a small western Maine community north of Farmington as told by a team consisting of Strong Historical Society, Strong Elementary School, and Strong Public Library. Exhibit topics include Strong's prominence in the wood products industry (it was once the "Toothpick Capital of the World"), the "Bridge that Changed the Map," schools and educational history, clubs and organizations, "Fly Rod" Crosby, the first Maine guide, and a rich student section related to the Civil War and post-Civil War era in the town.

Site

Nils and Karna Persson, New Sweden, ca. 1890

Maine's Swedish Colony, July 23, 1870

A history of Maine's Swedish Colony in Aroostook County. Project partners include Caribou Public Library, Maine Swedish Colony, New Sweden School, New Sweden Historical Society, Nylander Museum, and Stockholm Historical Society. In addition to a substantive history of the Colony generally, exhibit topics cover specific family histories, Olof Nylander, mills and homes in Stockholm, hand tools, railroads, and more.

Site

1794 map of Farmington

Farmington: Franklin County's Shiretown

The history of Farmington as depicted by representatives from Farmington Historical Society, Farmington Public Library, Center for Community GIS, University of Maine at Farmington, and the Mallett School. Topics covered include education, culture, early settlers, important residents, agriculture, and a special section on maps.