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Keywords: ski sports

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Historical Items (141)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (6)  |  Sites (7)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 141 View All

Item 18907

Title: Lacing ski boots, Pleasant Mountain, ca. 1955

Contributed by: Ski Museum of Maine

Date: circa 1955

Location: Bridgton

Media: black and white photograph

Item 18908

Title: Pleasant Mountain ski instructor, ca. 1965

Contributed by: Ski Museum of Maine

Date: circa 1965

Location: Bridgton

Media: black & white photograph

Item 18916

Title: Aerial view of Pleasant Mountain ski trails

Contributed by: Ski Museum of Maine

Date: circa 1960

Location: Bridgton

Media: black & white photography

Exhibits Showing 3 of 6 View All


Riding the Old Blue chairlift at Pleasant Mountain

Skiing Pleasant Mountain

By the second half of the 20th century, skiing began to enjoy unprecedented popularity. Pleasant Mountain in Bridgton (later Shawnee Peak) was Maine's foremost place to join the fun in the 1950s and 1960s.


Leaving the start gate at the Sugarloaf World Cup, 1971

World Alpine Ski Racing in Maine

Sugarloaf -- a small ski area by European standards -- entered ski racing history in 1971 by hosting an event that was part of the World Cup Alpine Ski Championships. The "Tall Timber Classic," as the event was known, had a decidedly Maine flavor.


Jacques Cartier snowshoe club, ca. 1925

Les Raquetteurs

In the early 1600s, French explorers and colonizers in the New World quickly adopted a Native American mode of transportation to get around during the harsh winter months: the snowshoe. Most Northern societies had some form of snowshoe, but the Native Americans turned it into a highly functional item. French settlers named snowshoes "raquettes" because they resembled the tennis racket then in use.

Sites Showing 3 of 7 View All


Lacing ski boots, Pleasant Mountain, ca. 1955

Ski Museum of Maine

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.


Nils and Karna Persson, New Sweden, ca. 1890

Maine's Swedish Colony, July 23, 1870

A history of Maine's Swedish Colony in Aroostook County. Project partners include Caribou Public Library, Maine Swedish Colony, New Sweden School, New Sweden Historical Society, Nylander Museum, and Stockholm Historical Society. In addition to a substantive history of the Colony generally, exhibit topics cover specific family histories, Olof Nylander, mills and homes in Stockholm, hand tools, railroads, and more.


Grist and saw mills on the Upper Falls, Rumford, ca. 1895

Western Maine Foothills Region

Eleven communities comprise the Western Foothills Region, all interconnected yet each with its own unique, rich history. This site is the beginning of the towns sharing their stories with the world, each other, and the next generation. Working closely with local schools, six historical societies came together to help the next generation understand the heritage of their area. We invite you to explore our exhibits that celebrate the individuals and events that formed our communities.