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Historical Items (478)  |  Tax Records (4)  |  Exhibits (3)  |  Sites (0)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 478 View All

Item 28631

Title: The Schooner "Pendleton Sisters", Islesboro, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Islesboro Historical Society

Date: circa 1900

Location: Islesboro

Media: Photograph

Item 26491

Title: Wormell Sisters of South Lubec, ca. 1885

Contributed by: Lubec Historical Society

Date: circa 1885

Location: Lubec

Media: Tintype

Item 10179

Title: Sisters of the Holy Rosary Convent, Frenchville, ca. 1950

Contributed by: Ste. Agathe Historical Society

Date: circa 1950

Location: Frenchville

Media: Photograph

Tax Records Showing 3 of 4 View All

Item 75755

Address: 173 State Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: The Hebert Sisters

Use: Dwelling - Single family

Item 75756

Address: 175 State Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: The Hebert Sisters

Use: Dwelling - Single family

Item 75757

Address: 177 State Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: The Hebert Sisters

Use: Dwelling - Single family

Exhibits Showing 3 of 3 View All

Exhibit

Culp's Hill from East Cemetery Hill

Meshach P. Larry: Civil War Letters

Meshach P. Larry, a Windham blacksmith, joined Maine's 17th Regiment Company H on August 18, 1862. Larry and his sister, Phebe, wrote to each other frequently during the Civil War, and his letters paint a vivid picture of the life of a soldier.

Exhibit

Camp Tekakwitha brochure, Leeds, ca. 1940

From French Canadians to Franco-Americans

French Canadians who emigrated to the Lewiston-Auburn area faced discrimination as children and adults -- such as living in "Little Canada" tenements and being ridiculed for speaking French -- but also adapted to their new lives and sustained many cultural traditions.

Exhibit

Mary King Scrimgeour dress, Lewiston, ca. 1895

Dressing Up, Standing Out, Fitting In

Adorning oneself to look one's "best" has varied over time, gender, economic class, and by event. Adornments suggest one's sense of identity and one's intent to stand out or fit in.