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Historical Items (292)  |  Tax Records (5)  |  Exhibits (5)  |  Sites (0)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 292 View All

Item 9501

Title: Watermelon race, Squirrel Island, ca. 1907

Contributed by: Stanley Museum

Date: circa 1907

Location: Southport

Media: Black & White Photograph

Item 8164

Title: Bicycle race, Fairfield, 1888

Contributed by: Skowhegan History House

Date: 1888

Location: Fairfield

Media: Photograph

Item 9500

Title: Three-Legged Race, Squirrel Island, ca. 1907

Contributed by: Stanley Museum

Date: circa 1907

Location: Southport

Media: Black & White Photograph

Tax Records Showing 3 of 5 View All

Item 84172

Address: Race property, E. Side Wiley Street, Peaks Island, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Edmund K. Race

Use: Summer Dwelling

Item 84169

Address: Race property, S. Side Wiley Street, Peaks Island, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Edmund K. Race

Use: Summer Dwelling

Item 61327

Address: 6 Lincoln Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Mary P. Race

Use: Dwelling - Two family

Exhibits Showing 3 of 5 View All

Exhibit

Motor Coachmen and their Stanley Cars, Poland Spring, 1911

Auto Racing in Maine: 1911

The novelty of organized auto racing came to Maine in 1911 with a hill-climbing event in Poland and speed racing at Old Orchard Beach. Drivers and cars came from all over New England for these events.

Exhibit

Flagpoles, 1971 Sugarloaf World Cup Ski Races

World Alpine Ski Racing in Maine

Sugarloaf -- a small ski area by European standards -- entered ski racing history in 1971 by hosting an event that was part of the World Cup Alpine Ski Championships. The "Tall Timber Classic," as the event was known, had a decidedly Maine flavor.

Exhibit

Jack Lawrence, Saco, on Bicycle, ca. 1900

A Craze for Cycling

Success at riding a bike mirrored success in life. Bicycling could bring families together. Bicycling was good for one's health. Bicycling was fun. Bicycles could go fast. Such were some of the arguments made to induce many thousands of people around Maine and the nation to take up the new pastime at the end of the nineteenth century.