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Keywords: orphans


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Historical Items (249)  |  Tax Records (4)  |  Exhibits (10)  |  Sites (3)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 249 View All

Item 50974

Title: Good Will orphans, Fairfield, ca. 1920

Contributed by: L.C. Bates Museum / Good Will-Hinckley Homes

Date: circa 1920

Location: Fairfield

Media: black and white photograph

Item 50107

Title: Orphans sledding, Hinckley, ca. 1915

Contributed by: L.C. Bates Museum / Good Will-Hinckley Homes

Date: circa 1915

Location: Fairfield

Media: Photographic print

Item 50235

Title: Orphans doing road work, Hinckley, ca. 1920

Contributed by: L.C. Bates Museum / Good Will-Hinckley Homes

Date: circa 1920

Location: Fairfield

Media: Lantern Slide

Tax Records Showing 3 of 4 View All

Item 70374

Address: 139-151 Pleasant Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Female Orphan Asylum

Use: Orphan Asylum

Item 85287

Address: Roman Catholic Bishop of Portland property, East Side of Island, Little Diamond Island, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Roman Catholic Bishop of Portland

Use: Orphan Asylum

Item 70375

Address: Assessor's Record, 147 Pleasant Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Female Orphan Asylum

Use: Garage used as Playhouse

Exhibits Showing 3 of 10 View All

Exhibit

Page Terrace, Fairfield, ca. 1930

Good Will-Hinckley: Building a Landscape

The landscape at the Good Will-Hinckley campus in Fairfield was designed to help educate and influence the orphans and other needy children at the school and home.

Exhibit

Good Will Farm roundel, 1918

George W. Hinckley and Needy Boys and Girls

George W. Hinckley wanted to help needy boys. The farm, school and home he ran for nearly sixty nears near Fairfield stressed home, religion, education, discipline, industry, and recreation.

Exhibit

Writing on the board, North School, c. 1915

Back to School

Public education has been a part of Maine since Euro-American settlement began to stabilize in the early eighteenth century. But not until the end of the nineteenth century was public education really compulsory in Maine.

Sites Showing 3 of 3 View All

Site

Moody School, Good Will Farm, Fairfield, 1911

L.C. Bates Museum/Good Will-Hinckley

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site

Welcome to Strong sign, Strong, ca. 1950

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village

The history of a small western Maine community north of Farmington as told by a team consisting of Strong Historical Society, Strong Elementary School, and Strong Public Library. Exhibit topics include Strong's prominence in the wood products industry (it was once the "Toothpick Capital of the World"), the "Bridge that Changed the Map," schools and educational history, clubs and organizations, "Fly Rod" Crosby, the first Maine guide, and a rich student section related to the Civil War and post-Civil War era in the town.

Site

Sorting gap, North Lincoln, 1910

Lincoln, Maine

The history of a long-time mill town as depicted by seventh and eighth grade students at Mattanawcook Junior High School, with help from Lincoln Historical Society and Lincoln Memorial Library. The site includes exhibits on the paper industry, founding fathers, wartime Lincoln, Main Street, influential institutions, and communication and transportation.