Maine Memory Network
Maine's Online Museum

Login · My Account · Show Album


 

 

Search Results

Keywords: mill housing


Search within these results  |  New Search  |  Advanced Search

Historical Items (231)  |  Tax Records (46)  |  Exhibits (45)  |  Sites (38)  |  My Maine Stories (0)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 231 View All

Item 78918

Bag Mill bachelor housing, Rumford, 1946

Contributed by: Greater Rumford Area Historical Society

Date: 1946-08-08

Location: Rumford

Media: black and white photo

Item 67427

Hollingsworth & Whitney housing, Winslow, ca. 1920

Contributed by: Winslow Historical Preservation Committee

Date: circa 1920

Location: Winslow

Media: Photograph

Item 82183

Mill Housing, Canal Street, Lewiston, ca.1880

Contributed by: Franco-American Collection

Date: circa 1880

Location: Lewiston

Media: Photograph

Tax Records Showing 3 of 46 View All

Item 86133

Lumber Storage and Mill, Brown Wharf Mill Building, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: F B Irvin Lumber Company

Use: Lumber Storage and Mill

Item 70683

Mill, Marginal Way, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: F.A. Rumery Company

Use: Mill

Item 86141

Assessor's Record, Mill, Browns Wharf, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: F E Irvin Lumber Company

Use: Mill

Exhibits Showing 3 of 45 View All

Exhibit

  • Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter
Custom House, Portland, ca. 1910

Port of Portland's Custom House and Custom Collectors

The collector of Portland was the key to federal patronage in Maine, though other ports and towns had collectors. Through the 19th century, the revenue was the major source of Federal Government income. As in Colonial times, the person appointed to head the custom House in Casco Bay was almost always a leading community figure, or a well-connected political personage. The last presidential appointment was made in 1960, and the system abolished in in 1974.

Exhibit

  • Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter
Pulp pile, St. Croix Paper Co., Woodland, ca. 1910

Making Paper, Making Maine

Paper has shaped Maine's economy, molded individual and community identities, and impacted the environment throughout Maine. When Hugh Chisholm opened the Otis Falls Pulp Company in Jay in 1888, the mill was one of the most modern paper-making facilities in the country, and was connected to national and global markets. For the next century, Maine was an international leader in the manufacture of pulp and paper. 

Exhibit

  • Share this on Facebook Share this on Twitter
Pejepscot dam structure, Topsham, 1893

Powering Pejepscot Paper Co.

In 1893, F.C. Whitehouse of Topsham, who owned paper mills in Topsham and Lisbon Falls, began construction of a third mill on the eastern banks of the Androscoggin River five miles north of Topsham. First, he had to build a dam to harness the river's power.

Sites Showing 3 of 38 View All

Site

Ambajejus boomhouse, 2007

Ambajejus Boom House

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site

Sorting gap, North Lincoln, 1910

Lincoln, Maine

The history of a long-time mill town as depicted by seventh and eighth grade students at Mattanawcook Junior High School, with help from Lincoln Historical Society and Lincoln Memorial Library. The site includes exhibits on the paper industry, founding fathers, wartime Lincoln, Main Street, influential institutions, and communication and transportation.

Site

Dedication of monument to Blue Hill's founders, 1910

Blue Hill, Maine

The history of a small, but vibrant, Downeast village as told by an array of local institutions and organizations. Site contributors include Blue Hill Historical Society, Blue Hill Public Library, Blue Hill Consolidated School, George Stevens Academy, the Bay School, and the Jonathan Fisher House. Some of the topics covered include the arts, Jonathan Fisher, the Blue Hill Fair, Rusticators, the Civil War, education, and shipbuilding.