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Keywords: dessert


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Historical Items (23)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (1)  |  Sites (3)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 23 View All

Item 12343

Title: Tiered plate stand, Brunswick, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Pejepscot Historical Society

Date: circa 1900

Location: Brunswick

Media: ceramic, metal

Item 12300

Title: Pudding mold, ca. 1900

Contributed by: Pejepscot Historical Society

Date: circa 1900

Location: Brunswick

Media: metal

Item 12334

Title: Chocolate Menu, Brunswick, ca. 1870

Contributed by: Pejepscot Historical Society

Date: circa 1870

Location: Brunswick

Media: paper

Exhibits Showing 1 of 1 View All

Exhibit

Dee's Ice Cream Pint, Brunswick, ca. 1950

How Sweet It Is

Desserts have always been a special treat. For centuries, Mainers have enjoyed something sweet as a nice conclusion to a meal or celebrate a special occasion. But many things have changed over the years: how cooks learn to make desserts, what foods and tools were available, what was important to people.

Sites Showing 3 of 3 View All

Site

Skolfield Women, Brunswick, ca. 1900

Pejepscot Historical Society

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site

Hampden Highlands Post Office, circa 1908

Highlighting Historical Hampden

An introduction to Hampden history as presented by students from Reeds Brook Middle School, the Edythe L. Dyer Community Library, and Hampden Historical Society. Areas focused on include early settlement, expansion, Riverside Park, Hampden Academy, important residents, shipyards, the War of 1812, and more.

Site

Welcome to Strong sign, Strong, ca. 1950

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village

The history of a small western Maine community north of Farmington as told by a team consisting of Strong Historical Society, Strong Elementary School, and Strong Public Library. Exhibit topics include Strong's prominence in the wood products industry (it was once the "Toothpick Capital of the World"), the "Bridge that Changed the Map," schools and educational history, clubs and organizations, "Fly Rod" Crosby, the first Maine guide, and a rich student section related to the Civil War and post-Civil War era in the town.