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Keywords: convent


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Historical Items (182)  |  Tax Records (4)  |  Exhibits (14)  |  Sites (9)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 182 View All

Item 9859

Title: St. Louis Convent, Fort Kent

Contributed by: Fort Kent Public Library

Date: circa 1920

Location: Fort Kent

Media: Postcard

Item 10179

Title: Sisters of the Holy Rosary Convent, Frenchville, ca. 1950

Contributed by: Ste. Agathe Historical Society

Date: circa 1950

Location: Frenchville

Media: Photograph

Item 9852

Title: Notre Dame de la Sagesse Convent, St. Agatha

Contributed by: Ste. Agathe Historical Society

Date: circa 1905

Location: Saint Agatha

Media: color post card

Tax Records Showing 3 of 4 View All

Item 75986

Address: Assessor's Record, 583 Stevens Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: St. Joseph's Convent & Hospital

Use: Land only

Item 75987

Address: Assessor's Record, 583 Stevens Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: St. Joseph's Convent & Hospital

Use: Land only

Item 75988

Address: Assessor's Record, 583 Stevens Avenue, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: St. Joseph's Convent & Hospital

Use: Land only

Exhibits Showing 3 of 14 View All

Exhibit

Dunlap Declaration of Independence, 1776

Unlocking the Declaration's Secrets

Fewer than 30 copies of the first printing of the Declaration of Independence are known to exist. John Dunlap hurriedly printed copies for distribution to assemblies, conventions, committees and military officers. Authenticating authenticity of the document requires examination of numerous details of the broadside.

Exhibit

Reuben Ruby hack ad, Portland, 1834

Reuben Ruby: Hackman, Activist

Reuben Ruby of Portland operated a hack in the city, using his work to earn a living and to help carry out his activist interests, especially abolition and the Underground Railroad.

Exhibit

Jacques Cartier snowshoe club, ca. 1925

Les Raquetteurs

In the early 1600s, French explorers and colonizers in the New World quickly adopted a Native American mode of transportation to get around during the harsh winter months: the snowshoe. Most Northern societies had some form of snowshoe, but the Native Americans turned it into a highly functional item. French settlers named snowshoes "raquettes" because they resembled the tennis racket then in use.

Sites Showing 3 of 9 View All

Site

Bar Harbor Historical Society

Bar Harbor Historical Society

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site

Welcome to Strong sign, Strong, ca. 1950

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village

The history of a small western Maine community north of Farmington as told by a team consisting of Strong Historical Society, Strong Elementary School, and Strong Public Library. Exhibit topics include Strong's prominence in the wood products industry (it was once the "Toothpick Capital of the World"), the "Bridge that Changed the Map," schools and educational history, clubs and organizations, "Fly Rod" Crosby, the first Maine guide, and a rich student section related to the Civil War and post-Civil War era in the town.

Site

Survey Chart, Islesboro, 1884

Islesboro--An Island in Penobscot Bay

A history of one of Maine’s many populated islands. The site was created by a team consisting of representatives from Islesboro Historical Society, Islesboro Central School, and the Alice L. Pendleton Library. Early settlements, businesses and cottage industries, schools, water transportation, and summer resorts are the topics covered.