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Keywords: West Greenland


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Historical Items (3)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (2)  |  Sites (1)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 3 View All

Item 54927

Title: Inuit aboard schooner 'Bowdoin,' West Greenland

Contributed by: Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center

Media: negative

Item 55114

Title: West Greenland women aboard the 'Bowdoin,' 1926

Contributed by: Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center

Date: 1926

Media: negative

Item 55120

Title: U.S.S. 'Bowdoin' crew, Greenland, 1941

Contributed by: Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum and Arctic Studies Center

Date: 1941

Media: negative

Exhibits Showing 2 of 2 View All

Exhibit

Miriam and Donald MacMillan, Greenland, 1947

The Schooner Bowdoin: Ninety Years of Seagoing History

After traveling to the Arctic with Robert E. Peary, Donald B. MacMillan (1874-1970), an explorer, researcher, and lecturer, helped design his own vessel for Arctic exploration, the schooner Bowdoin, which he named after his alma mater. The schooner remains on the seas.

Exhibit

Preble House, Great Cranberry Island, ca. 1895

Great Cranberry Island's Preble House

The Preble House, built in 1827 on a hilltop over Preble Cove on Great Cranberry Island, was the home to several generations of Hadlock, Preble, and Spurling family members -- and featured in several books.

Sites Showing 1 of 1 View All

Site

Maternity, Hallowell Granite Works, ca. 1895

Historic Hallowell

The history of the smallest city in Maine as created by a team consisting of the Hallowell Area Board of Trade, Hubbard Free Library, The Row House, Vaughan Homestead Foundation, Hallowell Firemen’s Association, and students from Hall-Dale Middle School. Topics covered include: natural disasters, the granite industry and other industries central to the development of the city, firefighters and police, Hallowell’s contribution to modern medicine, the Kennebec River, and more.