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Keywords: Tobacco


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Historical Items (47)  |  Tax Records (5)  |  Exhibits (10)  |  Sites (3)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 47 View All

Item 16981

Title: Tobacco cutter, Haynesville, c. 1875

Contributed by: Aroostook County Historical and Art Museum

Date: circa 1875

Location: Haynesville; Philadelphia

Media: iron

Item 61116

Title: Clay Tobacco Pipe, Popham Colony, ca. 1607

Contributed by: Maine State Museum

Date: circa 1607

Location: Phippsburg

Media: Clay

Item 73939

Title: Wabanaki Pipe Bowl, ca. 1710

Contributed by: Museums of Old York

Date: circa 1710

Media: black stone

Tax Records Showing 3 of 5 View All

Item 36659

Address: 49 Center Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Felice Giampetruzzi

Use: Dwelling & Store

Item 37399

Address: 469-471 Commercial Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Mary Watts

Use: Dwelling & Store

Item 32034

Address: 91 Adams Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Alesandro DiMatteo

Style: Greek Revival

Use: Dwelling & Store

Exhibits Showing 3 of 10 View All

Exhibit

Jack Lawrence, Saco, on Bicycle, ca. 1900

A Craze for Cycling

Success at riding a bike mirrored success in life. Bicycling could bring families together. Bicycling was good for one's health. Bicycling was fun. Bicycles could go fast. Such were some of the arguments made to induce many thousands of people around Maine and the nation to take up the new pastime at the end of the nineteenth century.

Exhibit

Raleigh Gilbert, Popham Colony, ca. 1607

Popham Colony

George Popham and a group of fellow Englishmen arrived at the mouth of the Kennebec River, hoping to trade with Native Americans, find gold and other valuable minerals, and discover a Northwest passage. In 18 months, the fledgling colony was gone.

Exhibit

Good Will Farm roundel, 1918

George W. Hinckley and Needy Boys and Girls

George W. Hinckley wanted to help needy boys. The farm, school and home he ran for nearly sixty nears near Fairfield stressed home, religion, education, discipline, industry, and recreation.

Sites Showing 3 of 3 View All

Site

Mono Aircraft Company, Presque Isle, 1935

Presque Isle: The Star City

The history of a northern Maine community as told by an array of local institutions and organizations. Site contributors include University of Maine at Presque Isle, Presque Isle Historical Society, Mark and Emily Turner Memorial Library, Presque Isle Middle School. Some of the topics include historic buildings, potato farming, transportation and the Aroostook Valley Railroad.

Site

Hampden Highlands Post Office, circa 1908

Highlighting Historical Hampden

An introduction to Hampden history as presented by students from Reeds Brook Middle School, the Edythe L. Dyer Community Library, and Hampden Historical Society. Areas focused on include early settlement, expansion, Riverside Park, Hampden Academy, important residents, shipyards, the War of 1812, and more.

Site

Bangor from the east bank of the Penobscot River, ca. 1905

Life on a Tidal River

An introduction to Bangor history as depicted by a broad-based group of city institutions and organizations. Partners included the middle-level William S. Cohen and James F. Doughty Schools, Bangor High School, Bangor Public Library, Bangor Museum and Center for History, and individual city historians. Topics covered include early railroads, natural disasters, the Brady Gang, the Civil War, and the 1940s.