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Keywords: Richard King


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Historical Items (17)  |  Tax Records (2)  |  Exhibits (1)  |  Sites (2)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 17 View All

Item 29047

Title: Richard King House, Dunstan Landing, Scarborough, ca. 1930

Contributed by: Scarborough Historical Society & Museum

Date: circa 1930

Location: Scarborough

Media: photograph

Item 33689

Title: Rufus King of Scarborough, ca. 1820

Contributed by: Scarborough Historical Society & Museum

Date: circa 1820

Location: Scarborough

Media: Painting

Item 46818

Title: Helen King with school children, Portland, 1931

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: 1931-07-05

Location: Portland; South Paris

Media: Photograph

Tax Records Showing 2 of 2 View All

Item 60346

Address: Assessor's Record, 13 Lassell Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Richard J. King

Use: Garage

Item 60345

Address: 13 Lassell Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Richard J. King

Use: Dwelling - Single family

Exhibits Showing 1 of 1 View All

Exhibit

Mary King Scrimgeour dress, Lewiston, ca. 1895

Dressing Up, Standing Out, Fitting In

Adorning oneself to look one's "best" has varied over time, gender, economic class, and by event. Adornments suggest one's sense of identity and one's intent to stand out or fit in.

Sites Showing 2 of 2 View All

Site

Marsh Staddle, Scarborough, ca. 1900

Scarborough: They Called It Owascoag

The history of a 350+-year-old city south of Portland, the Scarborough site was constructed by representatives from Scarborough Historical Society, Scarborough Middle School, and Scarborough Public Library. Exhibits include the marsh, transportation and roads, shipyards and shipwrecks, clamming and lobstering, famous residents, and education.

Site

Welcome to Strong sign, Strong, ca. 1950

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village

The history of a small western Maine community north of Farmington as told by a team consisting of Strong Historical Society, Strong Elementary School, and Strong Public Library. Exhibit topics include Strong's prominence in the wood products industry (it was once the "Toothpick Capital of the World"), the "Bridge that Changed the Map," schools and educational history, clubs and organizations, "Fly Rod" Crosby, the first Maine guide, and a rich student section related to the Civil War and post-Civil War era in the town.