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Keywords: Native americans


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Historical Items (439)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (68)  |  Sites (26)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 439 View All

Item 7534

Title: Native American Battle Axe

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Location: Mt. Kineo; Rockwood

Media: Stone

Item 7543

Title: Native American grooved axe head

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Location: Newcastle

Media: stone

Item 27004

Title: Native American Pottery Shard

Contributed by: Maine Bureau of Parks and Lands

Location: Bristol

Media: clay

Exhibits Showing 3 of 68 View All

Exhibit

Chapman School patriotism, Portland, ca. 1920

"Twenty Nationalities, But All Americans"

Concern about immigrants and their loyalty in the post World War I era led to programs to "Americanize" them -- an effort to help them learn English and otherwise adjust to life in the United States. Clara Soule ran one such program for the Portland Public Schools, hoping it would help the immigrants be accepted.

Exhibit

Iron axe head, Auburn, ca. 1700

Indians, Furs, and Economics

When Europeans arrived in North America and disrupted traditional Native American patterns of life, they also offered other opportunities: trade goods for furs. The fur trade had mixed results for the Wabanaki.

Exhibit

Camp Tekakwitha brochure, Leeds, ca. 1940

From French Canadians to Franco-Americans

French Canadians who emigrated to the Lewiston-Auburn area faced discrimination as children and adults -- such as living in "Little Canada" tenements and being ridiculed for speaking French -- but also adapted to their new lives and sustained many cultural traditions.

Sites Showing 3 of 26 View All

Site

Champlain's map of Saco Bay and the Saco River, 1605

Biddeford History & Heritage Project

Highlights of Biddeford history presented by McArthur Public Library, Biddeford Historical Society, and Biddeford High School’s Project ASPIRE class. The site explores shipbuilding, the Civil War homefront, women’s clubs, influential residents, and some of the city’s famous artists and inventors.

Site

Nils and Karna Persson, New Sweden, ca. 1890

Maine's Swedish Colony, July 23, 1870

A history of Maine's Swedish Colony in Aroostook County. Project partners include Caribou Public Library, Maine Swedish Colony, New Sweden School, New Sweden Historical Society, Nylander Museum, and Stockholm Historical Society. In addition to a substantive history of the Colony generally, exhibit topics cover specific family histories, Olof Nylander, mills and homes in Stockholm, hand tools, railroads, and more.

Site

Welcome to Strong sign, Strong, ca. 1950

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village

The history of a small western Maine community north of Farmington as told by a team consisting of Strong Historical Society, Strong Elementary School, and Strong Public Library. Exhibit topics include Strong's prominence in the wood products industry (it was once the "Toothpick Capital of the World"), the "Bridge that Changed the Map," schools and educational history, clubs and organizations, "Fly Rod" Crosby, the first Maine guide, and a rich student section related to the Civil War and post-Civil War era in the town.