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Keywords: Maine Anti Slavery Society

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Historical Items (45)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (6)  |  Site Pages (4)  |  My Maine Stories (0)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 45 View All

Item 7346

Maine Anti-Slavery Society report, 1836

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: 1836-10-27

Location: Portland

Media: Ink on paper

Item 10222

Minutes, Portland Anti-Slavery Society, 1844-1846, 1850-1851

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: circa 1844

Location: Portland

Media: Ink on paper

Item 7485

Maine Anti-Slavery Society constitution, ca. 1833

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: circa 1833

Media: Ink on paper

Exhibits Showing 3 of 6 View All

Exhibit

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Letter from Ambrose Crane about stolen slave, 1835

Slavery's Defenders and Foes

Mainers, like residents of other states, had differing views about slavery and abolition in the early to mid decades of the 19th century. Religion and economic factors were among the considerations in determining people's leanings.

Exhibit

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Khadija Guled, Portland, 2009

400 years of New Mainers

Immigration is one of the most debated topics of debate in Maine. Controversy aside, immigration is also America's oldest tradition, and along with religious tolerance, what our nation was built upon. Since the first people—the Wabanaki—permitted Europeans to settle in the land now known as Maine, we have been a state of immigrants.

Exhibit

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Reuben Ruby hack ad, Portland, 1834

Reuben Ruby: Hackman, Activist

Reuben Ruby of Portland operated a hack in the city, using his work to earn a living and to help carry out his activist interests, especially abolition and the Underground Railroad.

Site Pages Showing 3 of 4 View All

Site Page

Life on a Tidal River - Bangor and Social Reform Movements of the 1800s-1900s

The first president of the Bangor Anti-Slavery Society was John Godfrey. During the 1800's a fair number of African Americans made Bangor their home.

Site Page

Adam Simpson Green, Colby College, 1887

Colby College Special Collections

View collections, facts, and contact information for this Contributing Partner.

Site Page

Historic Hallowell - Values and Charity

The first Anti-Slavery Society in Maine was organized here in 1833, and a Temperance Society exerted a strong influence for many years.