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Keywords: Le Messager

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Historical Items (9)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (3)  |  Site Pages (0)  |  My Maine Stories (0)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 9 View All

Item 79912

Le Messager Newspaper Staff, 175 Lincoln Street, Lewiston, 1908

Contributed by: Franco-American Collection

Date: 1908

Location: Lewiston

Media: Photographic print

Item 18880

Jean-Baptiste Couture, Lewiston

Contributed by: Franco-American Collection

Date: circa 1900

Location: Lewiston

Media: Photographic print

Item 82077

Louis J. Martel, 1899

Contributed by: Franco-American Collection

Date: 1899

Location: Lewiston

Media: Plaster

Exhibits Showing 3 of 3 View All

Exhibit

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Jean-Baptiste Couture, Lewiston, 1926

Le Théâtre

Lewiston, Maine's second largest city, was long looked upon by many as a mill town with grimy smoke stacks, crowded tenements, low-paying jobs, sleazy clubs and little by way of refinement, except for Bates College. Yet, a noted Québec historian, Robert Rumilly, described it as "the French Athens of New England."

Exhibit

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Jacques Cartier snowshoe club, ca. 1925

Les Raquetteurs

In the early 1600s, French explorers and colonizers in the New World quickly adopted a Native American mode of transportation to get around during the harsh winter months: the snowshoe. Most Northern societies had some form of snowshoe, but the Native Americans turned it into a highly functional item. French settlers named snowshoes "raquettes" because they resembled the tennis racket then in use.

Exhibit

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Nave, St. Peter and Paul Church, Lewiston

La Basilique Lewiston

Like many cities in France, Lewiston and Auburn's skylines are dominated by a cathedral-like structure, St. Peter and Paul Church. Now designated a basilica by the Vatican, it stands as a symbol of French Catholic contributions to the State of Maine.