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Historical Items (3)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (6)  |  Site Pages (0)  |  My Maine Stories (0)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 3 View All

Item 23476

Penobscot walking stick, ca. 1930

Contributed by: Hudson Museum, Univ. of Maine

Date: circa 1930

Media: Wood

Item 23481

Penobscot rootclub, ca. 1930

Contributed by: Hudson Museum, Univ. of Maine

Date: circa 1930

Location: Indian Island

Media: Wood

Item 82339

George Chase Letter on CCC, Brownville Junction, 1991

Contributed by: Maine Conservation Corps

Date: circa 1940

Location: Brownville Junction; Bar Harbor

Media: Ink on paper

Exhibits Showing 3 of 6 View All

Exhibit

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Wabanaki trade brooch, ca. 1780

Gifts From Gluskabe: Maine Indian Artforms

According to legend, the Great Spirit created Gluskabe, who shaped the world of the Native People of Maine, and taught them how to use and respect the land and the resources around them. This exhibit celebrates the gifts of Gluskabe with Maine Indian art works from the early nineteenth to mid twentieth centuries.

Exhibit

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Henry Thurston Clark trunk, ca. 1872

Amazing! Maine Stories

These stories -- that stretch from 1999 back to 1759 -- take you from an amusement park to the halls of Congress. There are inventors, artists, showmen, a railway agent, a man whose civic endeavors helped shape Portland, a man devoted to the pursuit of peace and one known for his military exploits, Maine's first novelist, a woman who recorded everyday life in detail, and an Indian who survived a British attack.

Exhibit

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Noon Lunch, Eagle Lake, 1911

Umbazooksus & Beyond

Visitors to the Maine woods in the early twentieth century often recorded their adventures in private diaries or journals and in photographs. Their remembrances of canoeing, camping, hunting and fishing helped equate Maine with wilderness.