Search Results

Keywords: French-Canadian immigrants

Historical Items

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Item 9916

St. Ignatius, Martyr, Church, Sanford, ca. 1895

Contributed by: Sanford-Springvale Historical Society Date: circa 1895 Location: Sanford Media: Photographic print

Item 18377

Sts. Peter and Paul Basilica, Lewiston, 2005

Contributed by: Franco-American Collection Date: 2005 Location: Lewiston Media: Photographic print

Item 103129

Lunn & Sweet baseball team, Industrial League Champions, Lewiston, 1916

Courtesy of Kathy Bolduc Amoroso, an individual partner Date: 1916 Location: Auburn Media: Photographic Print

Exhibits

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Exhibit

From French Canadians to Franco-Americans

French Canadians who emigrated to the Lewiston-Auburn area faced discrimination as children and adults -- such as living in "Little Canada" tenements and being ridiculed for speaking French -- but also adapted to their new lives and sustained many cultural traditions.

Exhibit

La St-Jean in Lewiston-Auburn

St-Jean-Baptiste Day -- June 24th -- in Lewiston-Auburn was a very public display of ethnic pride for nearly a century. Since about 1830, French Canadians had used St. John the Baptist's birthdate as a demonstration of French-Canadian nationalism.

Exhibit

Les Raquetteurs

In the early 1600s, French explorers and colonizers in the New World quickly adopted a Native American mode of transportation to get around during the harsh winter months: the snowshoe. Most Northern societies had some form of snowshoe, but the Native Americans turned it into a highly functional item. French settlers named snowshoes "raquettes" because they resembled the tennis racket then in use.

Site Pages

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Site Page

Biddeford History & Heritage Project - VI. The deluge of industrial expansion & immigration (1865-1900) - Page 2 of 2

Mary's), founded in 1855. Due to the influx of French-Canadians and the animosity between the French and Irish Catholics, a separate church--St.

Site Page

Biddeford History & Heritage Project - VI. The deluge of industrial expansion & immigration (1865-1900) - Page 1 of 2

… an intense level of immigration, first of Irish and other west European workers; then later French-Canadian, east and southern Europeans.

Site Page

Biddeford History & Heritage Project - Pierre Painchaud

… la France” during the weekly performances of French-Canadian ballads, chants, and folk songs at local parks.

My Maine Stories

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Story

How Mon-Oncle France came to Les-√Čtats
by Michael Parent

How Mon-Oncle France came to the United States.

Story

Ah, les Fameuse Ployes!
by Alain Ouellette

Growing up in an Acadian French family and eating ployes

Story

Growing up in Lewiston and running Museum L-A
by Rachel Desgrosseilliers

Growing up Franco-American and honoring our mill working heritage