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Keywords: Cumberland County Power and Light Company


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Historical Items (28)  |  Tax Records (5)  |  Exhibits (5)  |  Sites (5)  |  My Maine Stories (0)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 28 View All

Item 74442

Cumberland County Power and Light employees, 1927

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Media: Photograph

Item 74749

Cumberland County Power & Light crew, Portland, ca. 1915

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: circa 1915

Location: Portland

Media: Photograph

Item 74746

Forest Avenue power station interior, Portland, 1900

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: 1900

Location: Portland

Media: Photograph

Tax Records Showing 3 of 5 View All

Item 74580

Assessor's Record, Conduits House, Hooper Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Cumberland County Power & Light Company

Use: Conduits House

Item 74582

Storehouse, Hooper Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Cumberland County Power & Light Company

Use: Storehouse

Item 78307

29-33 Union Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Cumberland County Power & Light Company

Use: Electric Building

Exhibits Showing 3 of 5 View All

Exhibit

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Reddy Kilowatt lapel pin, ca. 1955

Wired! How Electricity Came to Maine

As early as 1633, entrepreneurs along the Piscataqua River in southern Maine utilized the force of the river to power a sawmill, recognizing the potential of the area's natural power sources, but it was not until the 1890s that technology made widespread electricity a reality -- and even then, consumers had to be urged to use it.

Exhibit

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Trustees' Office, Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village, ca. 1915

In Time and Eternity: Shakers in the Industrial Age

"In Time and Eternity: Maine Shakers in the Industrial Age 1872-1918" is a series of images that depict in detail the Shakers in Maine during a little explored time period of expansion and change.

Exhibit

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Custom House, Portland, ca. 1910

Port of Portland's Custom House and Custom Collectors

The collector of Portland was the key to federal patronage in Maine, though other ports and towns had collectors. Through the 19th century, the revenue was the major source of Federal Government income. As in Colonial times, the person appointed to head the custom House in Casco Bay was almost always a leading community figure, or a well-connected political personage. The last presidential appointment was made in 1962, and the system abolished in in 1974.

Sites Showing 3 of 5 View All

Site

Marsh Staddle, Scarborough, ca. 1900

Scarborough: They Called It Owascoag

The history of a 350+-year-old city south of Portland, the Scarborough site was constructed by representatives from Scarborough Historical Society, Scarborough Middle School, and Scarborough Public Library. Exhibits include the marsh, transportation and roads, shipyards and shipwrecks, clamming and lobstering, famous residents, and education.

Site

Ox Cart at N.W. Marston's Store, South Lubec, ca. 1880

Lubec, Maine

A history of the easternmost town in Maine as created by the Lubec Historical Society, Lubec Consolidated School, Lubec Landmarks, and Lubec Memorial Library. Exhibits include the sardine and herring industries, the Sardine Queen, the West Quoddy Head Lighthouse, the 1911 Centennial Celebration, the S. S. Cumberland Steamer, the gold hoax, an important community quilt, a tragic boating accident, and the blizzard of 1934, among others.

Site

Champlain's map of Saco Bay and the Saco River, 1605

Biddeford History & Heritage Project

Highlights of Biddeford history presented by McArthur Public Library, Biddeford Historical Society, and Biddeford High School’s Project ASPIRE class. The site explores shipbuilding, the Civil War homefront, women’s clubs, influential residents, and some of the city’s famous artists and inventors.