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Keywords: Cook Tent


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Historical Items (3)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (7)  |  Sites (5)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 3 View All

Item 82377

Title: Appalachian Trail Cook Tent, Millinocket, 1935

Contributed by: Maine Conservation Corps

Date: 1935

Location: Millinocket; Lakewood

Media: Photograph

Item 23732

Title: Boy Scout, Falmouth Foreside, 1921

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

Date: 1921

Location: Falmouth

Media: Glass negative

Item 7587

Title: Kitchen, Swan summer camp, Lake Wesserunsett, ca. 1905

Contributed by: Skowhegan History House

Date: circa 1905

Location: Madison

Media: Photographic print

Exhibits Showing 3 of 7 View All

Exhibit

Reddy Kilowatt lapel pin, ca. 1955

Wired! How Electricity Came to Maine

As early as 1633, entrepreneurs along the Piscataqua River in southern Maine utilized the force of the river to power a sawmill, recognizing the potential of the area's natural power sources, but it was not until the 1890s that technology made widespread electricity a reality -- and even then, consumers had to be urged to use it.

Exhibit

Northport Hotel, ca. 1900

Summer Folk: The Postcard View

Vacationers, "rusticators," or tourists began flooding into Maine in the last quarter of the 19th century. Many arrived by train or steamer. Eventually, automobiles expanded and changed the tourist trade, and some vacationers bought their own "cottages."

Exhibit

Noon Lunch, Eagle Lake, 1911

Umbazooksus & Beyond

Visitors to the Maine woods in the early twentieth century often recorded their adventures in private diaries or journals and in photographs. Their remembrances of canoeing, camping, hunting and fishing helped equate Maine with wilderness.

Sites Showing 3 of 5 View All

Site

Welcome to Strong sign, Strong, ca. 1950

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village

The history of a small western Maine community north of Farmington as told by a team consisting of Strong Historical Society, Strong Elementary School, and Strong Public Library. Exhibit topics include Strong's prominence in the wood products industry (it was once the "Toothpick Capital of the World"), the "Bridge that Changed the Map," schools and educational history, clubs and organizations, "Fly Rod" Crosby, the first Maine guide, and a rich student section related to the Civil War and post-Civil War era in the town.

Site

Bangor from the east bank of the Penobscot River, ca. 1905

Life on a Tidal River

An introduction to Bangor history as depicted by a broad-based group of city institutions and organizations. Partners included the middle-level William S. Cohen and James F. Doughty Schools, Bangor High School, Bangor Public Library, Bangor Museum and Center for History, and individual city historians. Topics covered include early railroads, natural disasters, the Brady Gang, the Civil War, and the 1940s.

Site

Somes Sound, Mt. Desert Island, ca.1900

Mount Desert Island: Shaped by Nature

Highlights from the history of what is perhaps the most popular tourist destination in Maine. The site was created by a partnership between MDI High School, Mount Desert Elementary School, and a number of supporting organizations: Acadia National Park, Bar Harbor Historical Society, the Jesup Memorial Library, Great Harbor Maritime Museum, and the Maine Granite Industry Historical Society. Exhibits cover Northeast Harbor, the Granite industry, Bar Harbor’s Building of Arts, the Green Mountain Railway, the Bryants and the Rockefellers, and steamboats.