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Keywords: Central Maine Power


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Historical Items (198)  |  Tax Records (1)  |  Exhibits (26)  |  Sites (17)  |  My Maine Stories (0)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 198 View All

Item 74759

Maine Yankee reactor pit construction, Wiscasset, 1968

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Location: Wiscasset

Media: Photograph

Item 74760

Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station, Wiscasset, ca. 1972

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: circa 1972

Location: Wiscasset

Media: Photograph

Item 74758

Maine Yankee brochure, Wiscasset, 1975

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: 1975

Location: Wiscasset

Media: Ink on paper

Tax Records Showing 1 of 1 View All

Item 86268

Power Plant, Commercial Street, Portland, 1924

Owner in 1924: Central Wharf Proprietors

Use: Power Plant

Exhibits Showing 3 of 26 View All

Exhibit

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Reddy Kilowatt lapel pin, ca. 1955

Wired! How Electricity Came to Maine

As early as 1633, entrepreneurs along the Piscataqua River in southern Maine utilized the force of the river to power a sawmill, recognizing the potential of the area's natural power sources, but it was not until the 1890s that technology made widespread electricity a reality -- and even then, consumers had to be urged to use it.

Exhibit

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Pulp pile, St. Croix Paper Co., Woodland, ca. 1910

Making Paper, Making Maine

Paper has shaped Maine's economy, molded individual and community identities, and impacted the environment throughout Maine. When Hugh Chisholm opened the Otis Falls Pulp Company in Jay in 1888, the mill was one of the most modern paper-making facilities in the country, and was connected to national and global markets. For the next century, Maine was an international leader in the manufacture of pulp and paper. 

Exhibit

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Casco Castle, South Freeport, ca. 1910

The Trolley Parks of Maine

At the heyday of trolleys in Maine, many of the trolley companies developed recreational facilities along or at the end of trolley lines as one further way to encourage ridership. The parks often had walking paths, dance pavilions, and various other entertainments. Cutting-edge technology came together with a thirst for adventure and forever changed social dynamics in the process.

Sites Showing 3 of 17 View All

Site

Oldest known photograph of Guilford, Covered Bridge, ca. 1850

Guilford, Maine

An extensive history of a small central Maine town as compiled by team members from Guilford Historical Society and Piscataquis Community Middle School, with input from Guilford Memorial Library, Guilford Economic Development Board, and the Guilford’s town office. Manufacturing, festive events, historic buildings, notable veterans, and education, are covered in depth.

Site

Sorting gap, North Lincoln, 1910

Lincoln, Maine

The history of a long-time mill town as depicted by seventh and eighth grade students at Mattanawcook Junior High School, with help from Lincoln Historical Society and Lincoln Memorial Library. The site includes exhibits on the paper industry, founding fathers, wartime Lincoln, Main Street, influential institutions, and communication and transportation.

Site

Ox Cart at N.W. Marston's Store, South Lubec, ca. 1880

Lubec, Maine

A history of the easternmost town in Maine as created by the Lubec Historical Society, Lubec Consolidated School, Lubec Landmarks, and Lubec Memorial Library. Exhibits include the sardine and herring industries, the Sardine Queen, the West Quoddy Head Lighthouse, the 1911 Centennial Celebration, the S. S. Cumberland Steamer, the gold hoax, an important community quilt, a tragic boating accident, and the blizzard of 1934, among others.