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Keywords: Arbor Day


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Historical Items (12)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (3)  |  Sites (1)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 12 View All

Item 9848

Title: Arbor Day, St. Agatha, 1923

Contributed by: Ste. Agathe Historical Society

Date: 1923

Location: Saint Agatha; Saint Agatha

Media: Photographic print

Item 69265

Title: Arbor Day Program, Farmington State Normal School, 1887

Contributed by: Mantor Library at UMF

Date: 1887

Location: Farmington

Media: ink on paper

Item 65834

Title: Arbor Day, Farmington State Normal School, 1917

Contributed by: Mantor Library at UMF

Date: 1917-05-14

Location: Farmington

Media: Black and white photograph

Exhibits Showing 3 of 3 View All

Exhibit

Arbor Day, St. Agatha, 1923

A Focus on Trees

Maine has some 17 million acres of forest land. But even on a smaller, more local scale, trees have been an important part of the landscape. In many communities, tree-lined commercial and residential streets are a dominant feature of photographs of the communities.

Exhibit

Students on porch, Farmington State Normal School, ca. 1928

We Used to be "Normal": A History of F.S.N.S.

Farmington's Normal School -- a teacher-training facility -- opened in 1863 and, over the decades, offered academic programs that included such unique features as domestic and child-care training, and extra-curricular activities from athletics to music and theater.

Exhibit

Reddy Kilowatt lapel pin, ca. 1955

Wired! How Electricity Came to Maine

As early as 1633, entrepreneurs along the Piscataqua River in southern Maine utilized the force of the river to power a sawmill, recognizing the potential of the area's natural power sources, but it was not until the 1890s that technology made widespread electricity a reality -- and even then, consumers had to be urged to use it.

Sites Showing 1 of 1 View All

Site

Welcome to Strong sign, Strong, ca. 1950

Strong, a Mussul Unsquit village

The history of a small western Maine community north of Farmington as told by a team consisting of Strong Historical Society, Strong Elementary School, and Strong Public Library. Exhibit topics include Strong's prominence in the wood products industry (it was once the "Toothpick Capital of the World"), the "Bridge that Changed the Map," schools and educational history, clubs and organizations, "Fly Rod" Crosby, the first Maine guide, and a rich student section related to the Civil War and post-Civil War era in the town.