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Keywords: Abolition

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Historical Items (84)  |  Tax Records (0)  |  Exhibits (4)  |  Site Pages (2)  |  My Maine Stories (1)  | 

Historical Items Showing 3 of 84 View All

Item 36594

White Church, Biddeford, ca. 1894

Contributed by: McArthur Public Library

Date: circa 1894

Location: Biddeford

Media: photographic print

Item 13308

Henry Hinsdale letter on Indians, abolition, New York, 1841

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: 1841-11-02

Location: North Fairfield; Paris

Media: Ink on paper

Item 99276

Lucretia Sewall to husband about dental issues, abolition, Portland, 1838

Contributed by: Maine Historical Society

Date: 1838

Location: Portland

Media: Ink on paper

Exhibits Showing 3 of 4 View All

Exhibit

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Letter from Ambrose Crane about stolen slave, 1835

Slavery's Defenders and Foes

Mainers, like residents of other states, had differing views about slavery and abolition in the early to mid decades of the 19th century. Religion and economic factors were among the considerations in determining people's leanings.

Exhibit

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Reuben Ruby hack ad, Portland, 1834

Reuben Ruby: Hackman, Activist

Reuben Ruby of Portland operated a hack in the city, using his work to earn a living and to help carry out his activist interests, especially abolition and the Underground Railroad.

Exhibit

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Henry Thurston Clark trunk, ca. 1872

Amazing! Maine Stories

These stories -- that stretch from 1999 back to 1759 -- take you from an amusement park to the halls of Congress. There are inventors, artists, showmen, a railway agent, a man whose civic endeavors helped shape Portland, a man devoted to the pursuit of peace and one known for his military exploits, Maine's first novelist, a woman who recorded everyday life in detail, and an Indian who survived a British attack.

Site Pages Showing 2 of 2 View All

Site Page

Life on a Tidal River - Bangor and Social Reform Movements of the 1800s-1900s

Constitution. Bangor and the Abolition Movement Ever since Maine officially became a state in 1820, it has never allowed slavery.

Site Page

Howard House, Bangor, 1869

Life on a Tidal River - Narrative

… American history: suffrage, temperance, and abolition. In Bangor, the last two caused considerable debate and some consternation among the…

My Maine Stories Showing 1 of 1 View All

Story

How the first chapter Veterans for Peace was founded in Maine

by Doug Rawlings


Veterans for Peace was founded in Maine and is now an international movement