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Primary Sources for Finding Katahdin Chapter 6, Section 2

This Document Packet Contains 7 Items


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Item 5539

Dorothea L. Dix, ca. 1870

Dorothea L. Dix, ca. 1870 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 6, page 169.

Dorothea Dix was a native of Hampden. She was a tireless advocate for the mentally ill, and focused particularly on prison and hospital reform. In 1861 Dix was appointed Superintendent of Nurses for the Union Army.

Dix illustrates that there were other reform issues besides slavery and temperance in play in the mid-1800's.

 

Item 5583

Hannibal Hamlin, statesman

Hannibal Hamlin, statesman / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 6, page 169-171.

Hannibal Hamlin, born in Paris Hill, served as a senator and a congressman for the state of Maine before becoming Vice President under Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War.

Hamlin did not believe in slavery; however, he did not advocate complete abolition. Hamlin believed the preservation of the Union to be the top priority, and therefore fought to confine slavery within the boundaries it already occupied.

 

Item 9278

Letter from Hannibal Hamlin, June 10, 1850

Letter from Hannibal Hamlin, June 10, 1850 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 6, page 170-171.

This 1851 letter, written by Hannibal Hamlin, discusses the coalition of Whigs, Woolhead Democrats, and Free Soilers who had joined together to advocate for abolition. In this document, Hamlin expresses opposition to the Democratic presidental nominee, because the candidate is in favor of extending slavery into the new western territories.

The Democratic party, with the exception of the Woolhead Democrats, was traditionally pro-slavery. In 1856, Hamlin decided to switch to the anti-slavery Republican party from the Democratic.

Transcription

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Item 6425

William Pitt Fessenden, 1869

William Pitt Fessenden, 1869 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 6, page 171.

Along with Hannibal Hamlin, William Pitt Fessenden (1806-1869) was a powerful political figure from Maine during the Civil War era.

Fessenden served on the Senate Finance Committee, the Committee on the Conduct of the War, and eventually became Secretary of the Treasury under Lincoln.

 

Item 9244

Letter from E.W. Farley to Rufus Choate, July 30, 1856

Letter from E.W. Farley to Rufus Choate, July 30, 1856 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 6, page 169-172.

This is an invitation to Rufus Choate to speak at an 1856 meeting of the Whig State Committee of Maine.

Choate was a Massachusetts State Senator who was instrumental in organizing the Whig Party in Massachusetts.

Transcription

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Item 9345

 Rufus Choate letter declining invitation to speak, 1856

Rufus Choate letter declining invitation to speak, 1856 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 6, page 169-171.

Rufus Choate replied to the invitation of the Whig State Committee of Maine with this famous letter. Choate writes his opposition to the newly founded Republican Party, and encourages Maine Whigs to do all they can to prevent the permanent formation of this party.

The Whigs were for a united and slavery-free country for moral and commercial reasons. The Whigs felt threatened by the Republican party, for the third party threatened to tear the traditional two-party system apart.

Transcription

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Item 5382

Call to arms, Portland, 1861

Call to arms, Portland, 1861 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 6, page 171-173.

This military broadside was posted on the Park Street Church in Portland on April 21, 1861. The persuasive tone of the call to arms urges Portlanders to take up arms in the newly declared Civil War.

 

 

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