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Primary Sources for Finding Katahdin Chapter 4, Section 4

This Document Packet Contains 8 Items


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Item 6417

Grand falls of the river St. John, 1836

Grand falls of the river St. John, 1836 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 118-121.

When Maine became a state in 1820, both Britain and the U.S. were beginning to realize the value of Maine's natural resources and quickly moved to claim the area.

Charles T. Jackson, in the first Geology of the State of Maine, wrote, "At a time when the boundary line between the British provinces and the United States is proposed to be drawn, it is certainly a matter of no small importance that we should know accurately the nature and value of the district in dispute."

 

Item 6883

St. John and Penobscot Rivers map, 1798

St. John and Penobscot Rivers map, 1798 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 118-121.

In 1798, surveyors and map makers were sent by the governments of Britain and the United States to determine the northeast boundary line between the two countries.

This sketch is part of a collection of maps made to help determine the boundary and was taken from one made by an Indian, Francis Joseph, on a piece of birchbark in 1798.

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Item 7564

Resolution to send troops to Madawaska region, 1839

Resolution to send troops to Madawaska region, 1839 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 121-122.

Maine resolved in 1839 to give land agents the power to use force to "arrest, detain, and imprison" all non-Mainers taking lumber in the northern portion of the state.

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Item 7210

Gov. John Fairfield letter about Madawaska, 1840

Gov. John Fairfield letter about Madawaska, 1840 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 118-121.

Maine Governor John Fairfield wrote on December 15, 1840 to Rufus McIntyre, a Bangor land agent, about problems in Madawaska. Tensions were rising in northern Maine as a result of the boundary dispute.


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Item 7495

Orders for troops to northern Maine, 1839

Orders for troops to northern Maine, 1839 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 118-122.

Maine soldiers stationed at Houlton, in orders given March 5, 1839, were "called out to enforce the supremacy of civil authority."

The orders called the British the "lawless depredators . . . destroying and plundering the almost invaluable timber on our public domain."

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Item 6642

Cartoon of Northeast Boundary dispute

Cartoon of Northeast Boundary dispute / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 121.

The last wooden blockhouse built in Maine was constructed at Fort Kent to protect against the Canadians/British during the Aroostook War when the boundary line was in dispute.

 

Item 7192

General Winfield Scott, 1786-1866

General Winfield Scott, 1786-1866 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 121-122.

The Revolution and Statehood had established governmental controls in the southern part of the state, essentially pushing the frontier to the north.

General Winfield Scott was sent to Aroostook County to guard America's interest in the area and prevent the British from controlling the region.

 

Item 6643

Webster-Ashburton Treaty cartoon

Webster-Ashburton Treaty cartoon / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 118-122.

Daniel Webster negotiated Maine's northern boundary at the end of the Aroostook War. His statesmanship brought a bloodless ending to the conflict and determined Maine's northern boundary.

His efforts also made the people in the Madawaska area American citizens.

Like their southern counterparts, who a generation before had grappled with a broadened governmental reach, the people in Aroostook suddenly found themselves subject to laws and taxes from a government a great distance away.

 

 

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