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Primary Sources for Finding Katahdin Chapter 4, Section 2

This Document Packet Contains 9 Items


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Item 7477

Copy of letter from Francis McLean to Henry Clinton, 1779

Copy of letter from Francis McLean to Henry Clinton, 1779 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 100.

British Brigadier General McLean wrote to Sir Henry Clinton about plans to build a fort at Halifax and rumors of the "enemy" planning at fort at Machias.

The letter was written in May 1779, and shows strength and organization of the British forces.

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Item 7476

Instruction from Henry Clinton to British troops, 1779

Instruction from Henry Clinton to British troops, 1779 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 101.

In April 1779, British official Henry Clinton wrote a letter noting that colonists who pledged loyalty to the British would not be "bothered" in an upcoming battle and would, after the war, receive land in return for their loyalty.

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Item 7472

Letter from Francis McLean to Henry Clinton, 1779

Letter from Francis McLean to Henry Clinton, 1779 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter, page 101-103.

British official Henry Clinton describes the Penobscot Expedition battle and the routing of the American fleet in this letter to General McLean.

The poorly organized Americans were little match for the veteran British forces.

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Item 7475

Henry Clinton letter on Penobscot River fort, 1779

Henry Clinton letter on Penobscot River fort, 1779 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 101-103.

Sir Henry Clinton in 1779 authorizes a British fort on the Penobscot River and discusses why it is necessary.

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Item 1323

Stephen Hall on Penobscot Expedition, 1779

Stephen Hall on Penobscot Expedition, 1779 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 102-103.

An American member of the Penobscot Expedition wrote about the American defeat, reflecting the disarray of Maine's defenses.

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Item 6949

Charter for New Ireland, 1780

Charter for New Ireland, 1780 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 103.

The British victory at Penobscot made eastern Maine safe for families loyal to the crown, and many families moved there.

This Charter for New Ireland provides evidence of the importance that the British placed on this part of Maine.

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Item 7478

John Campbell to Henry Clinton about capture of Peleg Wadsworth

John Campbell to Henry Clinton about capture of Peleg Wadsworth / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 104.

British officer John Campbell described to his commander Sir Henry Clinton the capture of Brigadier General Peleg Wadsworth on March 15, 1781

Campbell is proud of the incident as Wadsworth had been a major agitator in Maine.

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Item 7480

John Campbell letter on Peleg Wadsworth's escape, 1781

John Campbell letter on Peleg Wadsworth's escape, 1781 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 104.

John Campbell was then forced on June 22, 1781 to relate to his superior, Sir Henry Clinton, the story of Peleg Wadsworth's escape from British captivity.

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Item 6067

John Dunlop's deposition regarding land

John Dunlop's deposition regarding land / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 4, page 106.

Large land-owners, or proprietors, used depositions to prepare cases against squatters who believed that if they improved or farmed wild land they were entitled to own it.

The proprietors believed that they owned the land and were entitled to payment. A deposition was essentially a local person's word that the land existed as stated in the proprietor's deed.

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