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Primary Sources for Finding Katahdin Chapter 5, Section 4

This Document Packet Contains 6 Items


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Item 5749

John Sawyer letter to Rev. William Jenks, 1810

John Sawyer letter to Rev. William Jenks, 1810 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 5, page 148-152.

After the American Revolution, the Wabanaki suffered from poverty, discrimination, and displacement.

Native American people were forced to surrender their land to the new American government. Hunting ground was turned into farmland, and the Wabanaki could no longer survive by hunting, trapping, fishing, and migrating with the seasons.

This letter describes the attempts of a missionary to teach the Wabanaki how to become farmers. He writes, "they should settle, and cultivate their land - have a school for their children, & live like white people."

Transcription

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Item 5293

Maine Indian man, Portland, 1920

Maine Indian man, Portland, 1920 / Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

Chapter 5, page 148-152.

Living within the new American society was a difficult adjustment for Native people. Some found work in logging, camps, factories, and shipbuilding; but this new way of life was very far removed from their native roots of sustainability and living from the earth.

It was difficult for Maine's Wabanaki to survive in this new society that valued wealth and possessions over all else.

 

Item 7580

Letter from Oliver Brown to Abiel Holmes

Letter from Oliver Brown to Abiel Holmes / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 5, page 148-152.

This letter from Rev. Oliver Brown of Maine, Nov. 17, 1825, to Rev. Abiel Holmes of Cambridge, Massachusetts, discusses a school building on a Native American reservation. Formal schooling, like farming, was thought to help the Wabanaki "live like white people."

Transcription

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Item 6681

Children inside Danville Corner School

Children inside Danville Corner School / Androscoggin Historical Society

Chapter 5, page 152-157.

This image of a one room school house is typical of a 19th century school. Children of different ages were often taught in the same classroom, and often there was one teacher for grades K-8.

Towns were required to have public elementary schools by 1820. Many larger towns also created public secondary schools.

 

Item 6682

Danville Corner School

Danville Corner School / Androscoggin Historical Society

Chapter 5, page 152-157.

Children living in rural communities attented schools in private homes, churches, or buildings that had been converted from other uses.

It was not always easy for children to get to school when travel included a wagon or sleigh ride over several miles. Some communities built several school houses. Fryeburg, for example, had fourteen in 1825.

 

Item 7339

Bell Hill School, Otisfield, ca. 1899

Bell Hill School, Otisfield, ca. 1899 / Otisfield Historical Society

Chapter 5, page 154-158.

Many of Maine's earliest educational institutions including community schools, universities, and even libraries, were funded by tuition fees. Maine did not provide any state funding for schools until 1828.

 

 

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