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Primary Sources for Finding Katahdin Chapter 11

This Document Packet Contains 10 Items


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Item 12112

MCS campaigns for President in New Hampshire

MCS campaigns for President in New Hampshire / Margaret Chase Smith Library

Chapter 11, page 330-333.

Maine Senator Margaret Chase Smith, a candidated for the Republican nomination for president in 1964, posed during a campaign stop in New Hampshire.

Smith, born and raised in Skowhegan, was introduced to politics by her husband, Clyde Smith, who was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. On his deathbed in 1940, Smith urged Mainers to vote in Margaret as his successor. Maine complied, and Margaret finished out her husband's term. She served in the House for eight years, until 1949, when she was elected to the U.S. Senate.

Smith is especially remembered for her "Declaration of Conscience" speech when she denounced the excesses of Republican Senator Joseph McCarthy in seeking out communists in the United States.

Smith charged McCarthy with destroying First Amendment rights to free speech by making the U.S., "a forum of hate and character assination." She said, "The American people are sick and tired of being afraid to speak their minds lest they be politically smeared as "Communists"... Freedom of speech is not what it used to be in America. It has been so abused ny some that is is not exercized by others."

 

Item 12114

Margaret Chase Smith for President Campaign Button, 1964

Margaret Chase Smith for President Campaign Button, 1964 / Margaret Chase Smith Library

Chapter 11, page 330-333.

In 1964, Margaret Chase Smith sought the Republican presidental nomination. Over her eight years in the House and fifteen years in the Senate, Smith had become a well-known figure.

She never referred to herself as a "feminist;" however, she was interested in various issues that affected women.

By running for president, Smith claimed she was, "pioneering the way for women of the future." She did not receive the 1964 nomination.

This is a button from Smith's campaign for the presidency.

 

Item 12229

We Want A Woman In The White House

We Want A Woman In The White House / Margaret Chase Smith Library

Chapter 11, page 330-333.

Bucky Searles and Dick Nirenberg wrote this song about Margaret Chase Smith's campaign for the Republican presidental nomination. The lyrics are:

"We want a woman in the White House, we want some hist'ry to be made....To make the country hustle, give Uncle Sam a bustle, and make the Gen'ral Staff the ladie's aid. We want a woman with some know-how....Someone to carry on the fight....She'd eliminate a war and be home again by four, She's a woman and a woman's always right. She has a secret weapon that would cast a peaceful spell. It's "Bingo" played by Hotline with Nikita and Fidel. Evacuate the Pentagon; On this we're standing pat....But leave the building standing and we'll put in a laundromat. WE WANT A WOMAN IN THE WHITE HOUSE, Someone who really knows the score she would make the G.O.P. join the Democrats for tea, With a WOMAN IN THE WHITE HOUSE, and you know that it's the right house, with a woman President in Sixty-Four."

Transcription

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Item 12115

'Yes, I'll Try a Pair' cartoon, 1964

'Yes, I'll Try a Pair' cartoon, 1964 / Margaret Chase Smith Library

Chapter 11, page 330-333.

A political cartoon satyrized Margaret Chase Smith's run for the Republican presidental nomination.

 

Item 5650

Edmund Muskie delivering a speech, 1977

Edmund Muskie delivering a speech, 1977 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 11, page 336-337.

Another Mainer with presidental aspirations was Edmund Muskie. In 1954, Muskie was first Democratic in 20 years to be elected governor of Maine.

His victory revitalized the Democratic party in the state of Maine.

Muskie's major achievement as governor was reform of the educational system. He created School Administrative Districts, or SADs, to consolidate school districts and save money.

School improvements also had the effect of eliminating one-room schoolhouses, a move that was controversial.

Muskie is shown in this photo speaking to the Maine Democratic Party.

 

Item 10622

Vice presidential campaign poster, 1968

Vice presidential campaign poster, 1968 / Edmund S. Muskie Archives and Special Collections Library

Chapter 11, page 336-337.

In 1958, after serving two terms as governor, Muskie joined Margaret Chase Smith in the U.S. Senate. He fought extensivly for the environment and the improvement of housing in U.S. cities.

In 1968, Muskie ran for vice president, and in 1972, he ran for president. Muskie lost both races, but he remained a highly respected politician.

This is a 1968 campaign poster advertising Muskie's bid for vice president.

 

Item 10620

Muskie campaign button, 1972

Muskie campaign button, 1972 / Edmund S. Muskie Archives and Special Collections Library

Chapter 11, page 336-337.

A campaign button from Muskie's 1972 bid for president.

 

Item 9644

Leaders from Maine, Bangor, 1984

Leaders from Maine, Bangor, 1984 / Margaret Chase Smith Library

Chapter 11, page 344-347.

Pictured here are Maine's political icons of the 20th century: Edmund Muskie, William Cohen, Margaret Chase Smith, George Mitchell, and Joseph Brennan.

During the 1960s and 70s, Maine's politicians, particularly Republican Senator Smith and Democratic Senator Muskie, collaborated on many issues.

Maine, like the rest of the nation, was being rocked by the war in Vietnam and the Civil Rights movement.

Many Mainers came together to support peace, and stand against racial discrimination, violence, and war. Groups like the Greater Portland NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) were established to enable people to mobilize for various causes. Some progressive legislation came out of this era, including the Fair Housing Bill, which made discrimination in housing illegal.

 

Item 12576

Student strike, Colby College, 1970

Student strike, Colby College, 1970 / Colby College Special Collections

Chapter 11, page 346-347.

Following the example of Dr. Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement, students held anti-war rallies, marches, and demonstrations on campuses throughout the country. This image was taken at Colby College in Waterville during a student strike in 1970.

During the spring of 1970, some campus political demonstrations became violent. On May 4, National Guaaurdsmen shot and killed four college students at a rally at Kent State University in Ohio. Some people reacted with all-night vigils, special workshops, and by flying flags at half-staff on high school and college campuses.

Senators Muskie and Smith spoke at Colby the week following the Kent State shootings. Muskie, who was clearly favored by the students, spoke out against the war. Smith, on the other hand, defended president President Richard Nixon's military policy.

 

Item 9434

Native Americans at a rally, 1979

Native Americans at a rally, 1979 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 11, page 347-351.

From the time Europeans began settling in North, Native Americans and Europeans have fought over control of land and boundaries.

Dozens of treaties have been drafted over the years- the major ones in 1796, 1818, and 1833, after years of bitter warfare between the Indians and colonists. Eventually the Maine Indians were left occupying relatively small areas of the state.

In 1964, 75 Penobscot Indians held a sit-in protesting William Plaisted, - a white man who began building on an Indian Township, claiming that he owned the land. Over the years, the Penobscot's land had slowly dwindled from 23,000 acres to 17,000. Maine recently had built U.S. Route 1 through the township; Plaisted's claim was a final blow.

The Maine tribes hired lawyer Thomas Tureen to fight for their land. Tureen uncovered a 1790 law called the Indian Non-Intercourse Act that forbade the buying or selling of Indian land without consent of Congress.

Tureen and the Maine Tribes sued the state of Maine, claiming that the Wabanaki were owed 12.5 million acres of Maine land. The case went to court, and remained unresolved for a decade.

In 1978, President Carter stepped in. The federal government gave $81.5 million to the Penobscot Nation and the Passamaquoddy Tribe, and $900,000 to the Houlton Band of Maliseets. Paper companies and other landowners agreed to sell 300,000 acres of land to the tribes, and this land became Indian territory.

This photo is from a rally in 1979.

 

 

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