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Primary Sources for Finding Katahdin Chapter 10, Section 1

This Document Packet Contains 10 Items


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Item 14777

World War I recruiting poster, 1917

World War I recruiting poster, 1917 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 10, page 292-293.

When the U.S. entered World War I in 1917, the country had geared up to recruit men to join the Army and Navy.

Many men across the country between 18 and 45, inlcuding thousands of Maine citizens, were drafted, or required to serve in the military.

 

Item 13711

 World War I soldiers, Kennebunk, ca. 1918

World War I soldiers, Kennebunk, ca. 1918 / Kennebunk Free Library

Chapter 10, page 292-293.

In total, Maine sent 32,000 men overseas to fight. About 1,000 of them died during the 18 months the U.S. was involved in the war.

 

Item 5798

108 mm shell manufacturing

108 mm shell manufacturing / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 10, page 292-293.

Many commercial industries converted to wartime production. The Portland Company, shown in this photo, manufactured 108 mm shells for the war effort.

 

Item 13001

 Knox automobile, Portland, ca. 1909

Knox automobile, Portland, ca. 1909 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 10, page 294-295.

While automobiles were somewhat popular before World War I, production and consumption of cars really took off after the war.

Several Maine companies produced automobiles.

The more common automobiles became, the more the rhythm of everyday life in Maine began to change.

 

Item 9460

F. E. Stanley, Lewiston, ca. 1882

F. E. Stanley, Lewiston, ca. 1882 / Stanley Museum

Chapter 10, page 294-295.

Twin brothers from Kingfield, Francis Edgar Stanley and Freelan O. Stanley, were the first to develop a steam powered automobile. The "Stanley Steamer" was as fast or faster than the first gas-powered cars.

In 1906, a Stanley Steamer set the world record for the fastest mile at 28.2 seconds.

This is an image of Francis Edgar Stanley.

 

Item 15758

Prohibition election card, 1911

Prohibition election card, 1911 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 10, page 295-297.

Prohibition, or the outlawing of alcohol, had been a law in Maine since 1851.

A number of efforts to repeal the law had failed, but the various temperance societies managed to keep prohibition in place.

This advertisment was one method used by the temperance societies who urged voters to, "Save Maine -- Keep it clean for our boys and girls."

 

Item 15549

Prohibition cartoon, ca. 1925

Prohibition cartoon, ca. 1925 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 10, page 295-297.

Prohibition became a national law in 1920. Throughout the 1920s, bootlegging, or illegal smuggling of liquor, was common, particularly along the coast of Maine.

Noted Boston Post cartoonist W. Norman Ritchie drew this cartoon about Maine's connection to the "rum running" from Canada to the United States.

Maine was a bootlegging center because liquor was still legal just over the border in New Brunswick.

 

Item 15416

Cache of liquor, Portland, 1920

Cache of liquor, Portland, 1920 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 10, page 295-297.

This image depicts a raid on a store of illegal liquor in Portland.

 

Item 1265

Ku Klux Klan procession, Portland, ca. 1923

Ku Klux Klan procession, Portland, ca. 1923 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 10, page 297-299.

Ku Klux Klan membership reached an all-time high in Maine during the 1920s.

About 50,000 Mainers, or 6.2 percent of the total population of the state, were Klan members in 1924, actively protesting against non Anglo immigrants, particularly Franco-Americans, Italians, and Irish Catholics.

A national concern about traitors, spies, and subsersives led to immigrants being closely watched. This sentiment carried into Klan activities.

Mainers lost interest in the Klan rather quickly, although the bigoted attitudes that the group embodied persisted after its demise. In the South, where Klan members often targeted African-Americans, momentum was maintained much longer.

 

Item 5451

Ruth Fairbanks Stewart

Ruth Fairbanks Stewart / Maine Historical Society/MaineToday Media

Chapter 10, page 299.

The interest in demonstrating American patriotism can be seen in this image of a child holding a flag and dressed in a flag outfit.

 

 

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