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Primary Sources for Finding Katahdin Chapter 9, Section 1

This Document Packet Contains 11 Items


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Item 9588

Mt. Kineo House Bill, Sept. 10, 1875

Mt. Kineo House Bill, Sept. 10, 1875 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 9, page 261.

Frederick Dodge of Boston frequently traveled to the Moosehead Lake region on camping and hunting trips. His 1875 bill for a room at the Mt. Kineo House on Moosehead Lake includes charges for provisions that Dodge used during explorations into the Maine woods.

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Item 1022

Table Rock and Kineo Mountain, 1888

Table Rock and Kineo Mountain, 1888 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 9, page 258-260.

Maine woods visitor John Dunn photographed three fisherman using Table Rock as a casting platform on August 1, 1888.

In the late 19th century, a canoe, bamboo fly-fishing pole loaded with silk fly line and a hand-tied fly were considered state-of-the-art fishing equipment.

The three fisherman are dwarfed by the dramatic backdrop of Mount Kineo at Moosehead Lake.

 

Item 5657

John Dunn's Moosehead Lake 1889 diary

John Dunn's Moosehead Lake 1889 diary / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 9, page 258-260.

In the late 1800s large numbers of recreational sportsmen began coming to the state to experience hunting, fishing and camping in the Maine woods.

One frequent visitor was John W.G. Dunn of Philadephia and later St. Paul, Minnesota, who visited the Ragged Lake area from about 1890-1904.

He kept logs of his yearly visits in which he recorded his hunting and fishing successes and other activities.

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Item 5873

Chefs in the kitchen, Sandy Point Camp, 1896

Chefs in the kitchen, Sandy Point Camp, 1896 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 9, page 258-260.

John Dunn and his hunting and fishing companions often used Sandy Point Camp on Ragged Lake
in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

The seated man is guide Henry Tremblay. This trip to Ragged Lake included John Dunn, his father, Charles Bullen Dunn; guides Henry Tremblay and George Cripps, and water spaniels Ben and Grouse.

 

Item 5879

John and Alice Dunn, Moosehead Lake region, 1904

John and Alice Dunn, Moosehead Lake region, 1904 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 9, page 260.

In 1904, John W.G. Dunn brought his new wife, Alice M. Dunn, to the Moosehead Lake region.

By then, the Dunns had built a summer camp on the lake, which made it easier for the women to join the men who had been visiting Maine on hunting and fishing trips.

Through the efforts of Cornelia "Fly Rod" Crosby, many women came to the Maine woods to hunt and fish alongside their husbands.

 

Item 5885

Steamer Henry M, Lily Bay, Moosehead Lake

Steamer Henry M, Lily Bay, Moosehead Lake / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 9, page 260.

John W.G. Dunn and others often got into the Maine woods by taking a steamer up Moosehead Lake.

Railroads dropped visitors near the steamer dock. Depending on where the visitors planned to go, other modes of transportation were employed as well.

 

Item 1016

Fishing catch from Ragged Lake, ca. 1887

Fishing catch from Ragged Lake, ca. 1887 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 9, page 258-260.

Ragged Lake was a favorite destination of John Dunn and his sporting companions. Dunn enjoyed fishing for brook trout, and photography.

His photographs of his camp, his companions, and the fish and game he caught provide a visual idea of camping in the late 19th century.

Dunn's photos, like the one pictured here, are often artisitic. He carefully arranged the subject matter to create an aesthetic composition.

 

Item 1028

Canoeing in Maine

Canoeing in Maine / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 9, page 258-260.

"Dr. Jack," a hunting companion of Dunn, displays a string of ruffed grouse bagged during a successful day afield in the Maine woods in September 1883.

 

Item 5988

Seaside Park, Old Orchard Beach, ca. 1900

Seaside Park, Old Orchard Beach, ca. 1900 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 9, page 263-264.

Old Orchard Beach also was a popular tourist destination. Among the attractions in about 1890 were Seaside Park, Maze and Summer Theater.

 

Item 9138

Percival Baxter and Spotted Trout, Cupsuptic Lake 1884

Percival Baxter and Spotted Trout, Cupsuptic Lake 1884 / Baxter State Park

Chapter 9, page 264.

On June 3, 1884 young Percival Proctor Baxter had joined his father on a fishing trip to a sporting camp at Cupsuptic Lake.

The day was damp and cool with periodic rain, a good day for fishing.

After a while, Percival became impatient. His father told him that for the next fish he caught that weighed over five pounds, he would give him $10 per pound. Within an hour the boy had hooked an eight-pound spotted trout.

When asked what he was going to do with his $80, Percival said he was going to put it into a savings account. By 1957 "The Percival P. Baxter Fish Account" totaled more than $1,000.

At the time of Governor Baxter's death in June 1969 or shortly thereafter, it was announced that the monies accumulated in "The Percival P. Baxter Fish Account" had been donated to Inland Fisheries & Wildlife for fish research at the bequest of former Governor Percival P. Baxter.

(Story as related to Buzz Caverly by Helon Taylor)

 

Item 6650

Penobscot Root Club

Penobscot Root Club / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 9, page 264.

Native American carvers believed they were releasing the spirits of animals and birds from the wood they were working.

Root clubs made from the root bundles of immature gray birch trees were carried in dances and religious ceremonies.

They had become objects for tourist trade by the late 19th century. This club has moose, birds, a war-bonneted Indian head, and "Poland Spring, Me." carved on it.

 

 

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