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Primary Sources for Finding Katahdin Chapter 8, Section 3

This Document Packet Contains 7 Items


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Item 10012

Acadian Flag design

Acadian Flag design / L'Heritage Vivant Living Heritage

Chapter 8, page 243-245.

The Acadian Flag was designed by Father Marcel-Francois Richard and sewn by Marie Babineau in 1883.

Richard took it to the Second Acadian Convention in Miscouche, Prince Edward Island, Canada,in 1884 where it was adopted as the symbol for Acadians throughout the world.

The flag has the colors of the French flag: blue, white and red, and a gold star in the uper left corner.

The star represents Mary, the Virgin Mother, who guided the outcast Acadians through storms and sufferings. The first flag of this design is conserved at the cathedral Our Lady of the Assumption (Notre-Dame de L'Assomption) in Moncton, N.B.

Some American Acadians fly the flag. Another version of an Acadian flag has a Fleur-de-lis on the star and is mostly seen in Louisiana.

 

Item 9813

Roy House (Maison Roi), Van Buren, ca. 1990

Roy House (Maison Roi), Van Buren, ca. 1990 / L'Heritage Vivant Living Heritage

Chapter 8, page 243-245.

An Acadian home from 1790 from northern Maine.
This house comes from "les concession des Boniface" in Hamlin Plantation.

It is believed originally to have been built by Alexander Roi in 1790s, this house was constructed using the "piece on piece" method. The roof is a Normandy roof -- it curves up at the eves to form a gutter to collect rain water for washing, bathing and household usage.

The door faced toward the brook to facilitate the use of the brook. The house has one room and dirt floor with a fieldstone fireplace used for warmth and cooking.

The house is insulated with moss. Over the centuries it was used as a home and later reused as a tool shed.

It was dismantled and rebuilt in its original form from original materials at Acadian Village, Van Buren, in 1977.

 

Item 7293

Lisbon Street, Lewiston, ca. 1880

Lisbon Street, Lewiston, ca. 1880 / Lewiston Public Library

Chapter 8, page 243.

Many French-Canadian immigrants moved to Lewiston.

 

Item 9916

St. Ignatius, Martyr, Church, Sanford, ca. 1895

St. Ignatius, Martyr, Church, Sanford, ca. 1895 / Sanford Historical Committee

Chapter 8, page 245.

St. Ignatius, Martyr, Roman Catholic Church in Sanford was built in 1893 for French-Canadian immigrants who were attracted to the steady work in the local mills.

Not long after the photo was taken, the new St. Ignatius was built to the left of this church, while the old church became a parish hall and school.

 

Item 6859

Levesque Family in Marion Automobile, 1917

Levesque Family in Marion Automobile, 1917 / Franco-American Heritage Center at St. Mary's

Chapter 8, page 245.

The Levesque family is shown in their Marion automobile at the rear of their fish market on Lincoln Street in Lewiston, where they lived and worked.

 

Item 1157

St. John Church benefit program, Brunswick, 1915

St. John Church benefit program, Brunswick, 1915 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 8, page 243-245.

Advertisement for the Pierrots Menestrels at the Hotel de Ville, in Brunswick. The French American population sponsored concerts and theater productions in French in 1915.

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Item 7808

Benoit and Webber, Westbrook, ca. 1890

Benoit and Webber, Westbrook, ca. 1890 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 8, page 243-245.

The Benoit and Webber store was opened at 87 Main St. in Westbrook in 1890.

Arthur Henri Benoit, a French Canadian who had moved to Biddeford, went into partnership with C. H. Webber.

From this Westbrook store, Benoit went on to open clothing stores under the name A.H. Benoit Co. and Benoit's, notably in Portland, Lewiston, Brunswick, Biddeford and Ogunquit.

 

 

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