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Primary Sources for Finding Katahdin Chapter 7, Section 3

This Document Packet Contains 11 Items


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Item 6298

Blue-fishing

Blue-fishing / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 7, page 209.

Fishermen off the coast of Maine, spear fishing for Bluefish.

Many coastal Maine communities depended on the fishing industry to survive.

 

Item 6313

Landing fish, olden time

Landing fish, olden time / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 7, page 212.

The offloading of a catch of fish from a dory.

Cod was the most important fishery in Maine during the time of the Civil War, and was a dietary staple for families throughout the country.

Fishing for cod was relatively inexpensive, requiring only a boat, lines, and bait. The low cost of fishing for cod also increased its popularity.

 

Item 133

Fish processing, Eastport, ca. 1902

Fish processing, Eastport, ca. 1902 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 7, pages 210-213.

Fishermen caught a wide variety of fish off the coast of Maine such as cod, mackerel, herring, and haddock.

The fish were processed at facilities where workers dressed the fish, (removed the heads and internal organs), salted the meat, and allowed it to dry on outdoor racks, or "flakes."

 

Item 4152

Flake yard, Portland, 1854

Flake yard, Portland, 1854 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 7, page 212-213.

Fishermen mending nets and drying cod fish at the Flake Yard, on the Portland, Maine waterfront in 1854.

 

Item 7665

Pollock at Wilson's Beach, ca. 1930

Pollock at Wilson's Beach, ca. 1930 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 7, pages 212-213.

Long rows of flakes at Wilson's Beach loaded with pollock, ca. 1930.

 

Item 9749

Entries from 'Emerald' log book, 1859

Entries from 'Emerald' log book, 1859 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 7, pages 210-212.

Captain Parsons, of Biddeford, kept this journal recording the 1859 fishing season of the schooner Emerald.

The Emerald sailed out of Wood Island Harbor in Biddeford to fish for cod and other groundfish. The journal details the day-to-day activities of the vessel including landing and dressing fish, repairing nets and other gear, and seeing sharks and whales.

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Item 6641

Compass, Westbrook, ca. 1800

Compass, Westbrook, ca. 1800 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 7, pages 209-210.

The compass navigational tool that would have been used by seafarers.

 

Item 6095

Burnham and Morrill Company Trademark for Cape Shore Brand Canned Mackerel

Burnham and Morrill Company Trademark for Cape Shore Brand Canned Mackerel / Maine State Archives

Chapter 7, page 215.

A 1891 Burnham and Morrill Company trademark label for canned mackerel.

Mackerel were more difficult to catch, and sold for a significantly higher price than cod.

 

Item 6296

Clam-digger

Clam-digger / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 7, page 215.

Clam diggers work Maine's beaches and mudflats during mid to low tide. Clammers use clam rakes to dig deep into the sand and pry up the clams living in the mud.

The clamming industry was not as large as cod fishing or lobstering, but did provide income to numerous Mainers.

 

Item 7667

Lobster traps and women, 1937

Lobster traps and women, 1937 / Maine Historical Society

Chapter 7, page 214.

Regulation lobster traps used by Frontier Maine fishermen from Eastport.

During the 19th and early 20th centuries there were very few fisherman lobstering the waters of Maine. Today, lobstering has become one of Maine's most important marine industries.

As the demand for cod dwindled after the Civil War, lobster began to replace the fish as a dietary staple.

 

Item 6094

Burnham and Morrill Red Jacket lobster label

Burnham and Morrill Red Jacket lobster label / Maine State Archives

Chapter 7, page 214.

Burnham and Morrill began canning lobster in addition to mackerel at the turn of the 20th century.

 

 

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