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View of Pleasant River and Addison, ca. 1920

Contributed by Penobscot Marine Museum

The picture was taken from the Red Bridge looking across Pleasant River to Addison Village. To the extreme right is the Coal Shed, which was built to hold coal brought in by shops. It was made of hemlock lumber because it is a sturdy wood and will stand the weather. The lumber was put smooth side in so it would be easier to shovel the coal out.

The white house three buildings beyond the Coal Shed was one of two hotels at Addison Point. It was the Addison House and sometimes "Halls Hotel."

The large two-story structure, with wings on both east and west ends, overlooked the river from the area behind the town’s present fire stations. The only part of the building still standing in 2013 was the east wing, including the front porch with its rows of narrow pillars.

The building on the right is the Addison Point Baptist vestry, built in 1826 by the Baptist Church the same year it was organized, with 57 members. Many years later Albert Dalot owned and used this property for a stone barn, where he made monuments and grave markers from the granite from the Dalotville quarry.

To the left of the vestry are the Allen Bailey, Ames Godfrey, William Nash, and Clapton Small homes.

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Other Information


  • Title: View of Pleasant River and Addison, ca. 1920
  • Creation Date: circa 1920
  • Subject Date: circa 1920
  • Town: Addison
  • County: Washington
  • State: ME
  • Media: Glass Negative
  • Dimensions: 12.75 cm x 17.75 cm
  • Local Code: LB2010.9.118216
  • Collection: Eastern Illustrating and Publishing Company
  • Object Type: Image

For more information about this item, contact:

Penobscot Marine Museum
PO Box 498, 5 Church Street, Searsport, ME 04974
(207) 548-2529
Website

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